August 24, 2016

Latest posts from Home Education Foundation

Students to learn online from home instead of at school under major education reform

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11699382

Education Minister Hekia Parata has introduced major education reforms. Photo /  John Borren

School-age students will be able to enrol in an accredited online learning provider instead of attending school, under new Government legislation.

The move has dismayed the primary school teachers’ union who say education is about learning to work and play with other children.

The radical change will see any registered school, tertiary provider such as a polytechnic or an approved body corporate be able to apply to be a “community of online learning” (COOL).

Any student of compulsory schooling age will be able to enrol in a COOL – and that provider will determine whether students will need to physically attend for all or some of the school day.

The Ministry of Education says this requirement may depend on the type of COOL.

Regulations will set out the way in which attendance in an online learning environment will be measured.

The change is part of legislation that has been introduced by Education Minister Hekia Parata.

She said it was the biggest update to education in New Zealand in nearly 30 years.

“COOLs will be open to as wide a range of potential providers as possible to gain the greatest benefits for young people,” Parata said.

“This innovative way of delivering education offers a digital option to engage students, grow their digital fluency, and connect them even more to 21st century opportunities.

“There will be a rigorous accreditation process alongside ongoing monitoring to ensure quality education is being provided.”

Online schooling models are used overseas.

In the United States, there has been strong growth in the number of online charter schools, which are publicly-funded but privately-run.

Some of the schools in the US providing online tuition do not have physical classrooms – students and teachers work from home on computers, communicating over email or a web platform.

Charter or “partnership” schools were introduced to New Zealand as part of National’s agreement with the Act Party.

A spokeswoman for Parata said the existing correspondence school Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu would become an accredited online provider.

“COOLs are being opened up to as wide a range of potential providers as possible to get the greatest benefits for students. One of the advantages of more providers is the ability to develop specialist niche provisions, eg. in Asian languages.”

NZEI president Louise Green said the experience of online schooling in the US was “woeful”.

“All the evidence is clear that high-quality teaching is the single biggest influence in-school on children’s achievement.

“Education is also about learning to work and play with other children and to experience both growing independence and a range of activities outside the home.

“This proposal was not subject to any consultation prior to appearing in the Bill. We are concerned it will open the door to a new market in private provision subsidised by the taxpayer that will take resourcing away from public schools.”

Post Primary Teachers’ Association (PPTA) president Angela Roberts said the change would only benefit private business.

“Our students are not a commodity to be traded on the open market…there is no new opportunity created by this. The only advantage is to business to dip their hand in to the public purse.”

Labour’s education spokesman Chris Hipkins said the move to online learning brought risks.

“Kids get a lot of social interaction at school, a lot of their personal development happens when they are at school.”

NZ First education spokeswoman Tracey Martin said the changes amounted to a “social experiment”.

“This continues to build on this governments belief that ‘anyone can teach’ and those that will pay the price for this ignorance will be out children.”

Te Kura is currently the only correspondence school. The change would open it up to competition.

Act leader David Seymour, who is Under-Secretary to the Minister of Education, said the changes announced today were not about clearing the way for online charter schools.

That was because there was nothing in the current law that would stop a partnership school allowing students to learn online from home.

An application to establish an online partnership school was rejected by the Government-appointed authorisation board in 2013.

“In principle, partnership schools have offered this opportunity for a long time…who knows what future applications will come forward,” Seymour said.

“I think the jury is still out about whether learning content online is a substitute for the social aspects of actually being part of a school community. But, look, it’s quite possible for some kids that’s exactly what they need.”

Dame Karen Sewell, chair of the correspondence school’s board of trustees, welcomed the changes.

“They will give young people and their whanau the right to choose the education that best suits their needs. Students could choose to learn online or face-to-face, or a mix of both, and have access to a much broader range of subjects regardless of the size and type of school they are attending.

“Many of these young people are referred to Te Kura after long periods of disengagement from education and when all other options have been exhausted,” said Dame Karen.

“Under the proposed changes students, with the support of their whanau or school, could choose to come to Te Kura – or to another COOL – and continue with their learning programme in an environment which may be better suited to them.”

Currently about 23,000 students use the correspondence school each year. About half of those students use Te Kura for subjects or curriculum adaptation which their own school does not provide.

A regulatory impact statement by Dr Andrea Schollmann, the ministry’s deputy secretary of education system policy, said there was convergence between correspondence education and that done face-to-face.

“Evidence suggests that, where students have increased agency over their learning, including choice about where to enrol, this can increase their engagement…for some students, online learning may provide the best learning environment.”

Another option considered was to let all students enrol in the correspondence school, but it was ultimately decided to open up the market by allowing any school, tertiary provider or body corporate to apply to become a COOL.

Dr Schollmann’s impact statement did note that international evidence suggests access to online learning increased student movement between providers, which could harm learning. There is also a risk that schools could use the changes to “move on” troublesome students.

However, she noted that accreditation would be removed from providers who had poor results.

NZ Herald

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

National Library of New Zealand’s strategic direction: submission

Email from the National Library

Consultation closes in two weeks!

Don’t forget to have your say on the National Library of New Zealand’s strategic directions before 31 August.

Kia ora t?tou

You may recall that I wrote to you about a month ago to invite you to make submissions on the National Library’s draft strategic directions to 2030. The submission period closes on 31 August 2016 and I am really interested to know your thoughts on our ‘Positioning for the future’ consultation document.

The document can be viewed by visiting www.govt.nz/national-library-future and I encourage you to make a submission through the same website. If you would like to provide feedback via email please send it to natlibfuture@dia.govt.nz.

Our aspiration is to ensure that New Zealanders everywhere have easy access to knowledge, to engage everyone in reading for pleasure, and to contribute to a prosperous New Zealand that values words as part of our heritage. This is bigger than any one institution so we are looking to uncover areas of common strategic interest and to identify strong partnership opportunities for the future.

The findings from the consultation will feed into a final strategy towards the end of this year and form the basis for an action plan for implementation from 2017 onwards. Your contribution and collaboration could help shape the future direction of the National Library and keep our proposed initiatives aligned with your priorities.

If you have any questions about the consultation, again please email natlibfuture@dia.govt.nz.

Ng? mihi

Bill Mac naught

Sorry that I missed this a month ago – we were travelling. If you use, or plan to use the National Library then make sure that your voice is heard via this submission process.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

ENGAGE 2016

Info on Engage Conference in Christchurch:

Hi All,

Just to let you know registrations are now open for ENGAGE 2016 (flyer attached) the Family Discipleship and Home Education Conference to be held again in ChCh this coming August 12-13. Spaces are limited, and registration is essential. To register please visit www.engageconference.org.nz. Please let us know if you want any flyers/posters.

Kind regards,
Kris Baines

ENGAGE POSTER

Click on photo to enlarge

What People Said About ENGAGE 2015….

“Thank you for organising and running Engage 2015. It was a great refresher and refocus for us and I feel that we will implement and mull on the things talked of during the conference to enrich our relationship with God, our marriage, our relationship with our children and our homeschooling journey.”

“Thank you so much for such a wonderful conference.  We had not expected to be so blessed, but we loved it and found it so refreshing.  It was such a treat to be there.  Even the younger children enjoyed it (as an example, 9 year old said afterwards, “I love conferences”).  Thank you so much for everything you put into making this such a fantastic event.  May the Lord reward you.

“Congratulations on the awesome conference you and your team pulled off this weekend…really appreciated the tips on
discipling our children and hearing the many wonderful speakers”.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Family of six to spend a year on a bus, filming a child abuse documentary

'We're committed to doing it and we'll find a way to fund it,' says Chris Lane, back right. He's pictured with wife ...

GEORGE HEARD/FAIRFAX NZ

‘We’re committed to doing it and we’ll find a way to fund it,’ says Chris Lane, back right. He’s pictured with wife Erinna and kids, from left, Theodore, 4, Lachie, 6, Joshua, 8, and Noah, 8.

Erinna and Chris Lane, of Te Awamutu, plan to pack up their life and take their family on a documentary-making mission.

The pair run Big Kid Productions and are taking their skills to the road to show what ordinary Kiwis can do to prevent child abuse.

“What we can do is we can make a film. So that’s what we’re going to try to do… It’s just about getting people to actually do something,” Chris said.

“Actual tangible change rather than clicking outrage on Facebook, which doesn’t actually change anything.”

Their project, which starts in October,  has been dubbed Stop The Bus and the aim is to produce a 90-minute film, with ongoing updates for social media.

Their four boys - Joshua, Noah, Lachie and Theodore – are reportedly super keen on the adventure.

“We’re just everyday, ordinary, ‘normal’ New Zealanders and we’re going to put our family on a bus for a year,” Erinna said.?

They’ll be looking for people who are making their communities stronger and already have a list of suggestions.

A bus will be the Lanes’ home for the time on the road but they’re still working on getting one.

They’ve spent about six months on research, including working with Child Matters, and have been visited by MPs.

“We’re committed to doing it and we’ll find a way to fund it,” Chris said.

Erinna and Chris started Big Kid Productions off with mostly wedding work, although they more recently made music videos for Avalanche City.

They’ve wanted to get into some film and documentary work for themselves for a while so Stop The Bus is that project.

“It’s quite a big deal and we don’t know how much money we will have to live or anything at the moment,” Erinna said.

“But we really believe in it so we’re going to do it regardless.”

Child abuse isn’t a positive topic but the Lanes want to make a documentary that will empower people to do something.

?”A lot of the documentaries that are out there are quite shocking and focus on the negative stuff,” Erinna said.

People featured in the film may not necessarily be dealing directly with child abuse, but could be working with at risk kids or helping a sports club create young leaders.

Chris is in charge of filming and editing, and hopes he’ll find space to work on their bus.

He describes Erinna as the “critical eye” and manager, but she’ll also be busy home schooling the boys.

Her vision for the documentary was to have people all across New Zealand linking arms to take ownership of the child abuse issue – a gesture too big to ignore.

So, in each place they visit, they’ll give people the chance to link up in front of some iconic local scenery.

Two other major aims of their documentary are to show child abuse exists across the board, not just in some sectors of society, and to give people ideas about what they can do to prevent it.

Outrage alone isn’t going to do it, Chris said.

“Everyone got enraged [about the deaths of the Kahui twins] and now we’ve got Moko 10 years later and everyone’s enraged.”?

The Lanes have been working with Child Matters, who will be their subject matter experts.

They are also supported by law firm Tompkins Wake and are hoping to set Stop The Bus up as a charitable organisation.

To support the project, visit givealittle.co.nz/cause/stopthebus#

 - Stuff - http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/inspire-me/81717427/family-of-six–to-spend-a-year-on-a-bus-filming-a-child-abuse-documentary

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Home Education Awareness Week (HEAW) 17 to 22 October 2016

Home Education Awareness Week (HEAW) 17 – 22 October 2016

Home Educators all over the country use this as an opportunity to do something special to raise their profile locally and develop a bit of positive public relations. This helps in gaining the movement a bit more credibility, especially when applying for grants or discounts with resource suppliers, or for admission to tertiary institutions or gaining help and advice from schools and perhaps even the use of some of their resources. And of course the benefits would be examined by more people, thereby bringing more people into the home schooling movement and your local support group.

For more information on HEAW go to: http://hef.org.nz/2007/home-education-awareness-week/

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

HEART Retreat: 24-26 June 2016

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

New doco says NZ education system is ‘grossly unfair’

Documentary maker Bryan Bruce says the government could do better for our children.

Bryan Bruce is not afraid to ask the big questions whether he is looking at child poverty or the growing divide between rich and poor. The Scottish-born Kiwi filmmaker, who was responsible for the documentaries Mind The Gapand Inside Child Poverty, is now putting New Zealand’s education system under the microscope.

In his documentary, World Class? Inside NZ Education: A Special Report, Bryan, a former teacher, looks at what he believes are some fundamental problems in schools.

He is critical of the reforms, known as Tomorrow’s Schools, which started in the 1980s in which schools became self-managing.

 ”So what happened in 1987 is the politicians got involved and thought ‘We know better than the teachers. We’re going to get involved and every school will manage itself and we’ll have these boards.’

READ MORE:
*Depression among Kiwi students a ‘crisis’
*Learning hubs to help steer M?ori to NCEA Level 2
*Marlborough colleges visit Christchurch for co-location ideas

“What happened is that schools in rich areas did really well because they had accountants and lawyers on their boards and schools in poor areas didn’t do well because they didn’t have the capacity to pull in money and all of that. What we’ve really ended up with is an apartheid system of education. Our system of education is grossly unfair.

“Every child who enters the public system of education should have the same right not just to enter it but to actually succeed in it and that’s not the case.

“If education was a reality game show I’d be giving out roses to the teachers and voting treasury off the island. I’d be telling the ministry that if they don’t help teachers more, they’ll be next to go.”

For his documentary Bryan travels to New York, China and Finland to compare their education systems with New Zealand’s. He also shines the spotlight on South Auckland’s Manurewa Intermediate, a decile one school he says is “one of the best schools in the country”.

“It’s run by an incredible principal called Iain Taylor. They have a discovery approach where you will find what the child is interested in and then you will teach from that position. So if a kid likes motorbikes you start there. They read about motorbikes. The idea is to develop a passion for learning.

“If you keep testing children on knowledge, you drive that passion for learning out of them.”

World Class? Inside NZ Education: A Special Report - TV3, May 24

 - TV Guide

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

Home Education Information Evening: Hamilton

image

===============================================================

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Exciting news from Canterbury University for Home Educators

Great news from Canterbury University
Home-school Student Award
Hi,

 I’d like to bring to your attention some recent work we have been doing at the University of Canterbury clarifying progression to university for home-school students. There are several pathways for home-school students to gain admission to UC for degree level study, which are outlined on a new web page we have created. Also for the first time UC Arts is offering a College Award especially for home-school students, which is tied to one of those pathways.

 UC Arts is offering home-schooled students the opportunity to receive a College Award of $3000 towards fees in their first year of full time study in a BA, MusB, or BFA.

 Please contact us if you would like to discuss ways that we can promote this offer to home-school students through your networks, or if you have questions about the College Award or the STAR programme.

For any enquiries about Special Admission or the STAR Programme please contact:
Franka Menzies, Academic Processes Co-ordinator 
franka.menzies@canterbury.ac.nz

For any enquiries about the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music or the UC Arts Home-School College Awards contact:
College of Arts Student Advisors 
artsdegreeadvice@canterbury.ac.nz

 Regards

Tim Winfield
Marketing and Outreach Coordinator
College of Arts, University of Canterbury
Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext 6756, Room 409, Karl Popper Building (view map)
www.arts.canterbury.ac.nz FollowUC Arts:

 

===============================================================

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

National Library registration and lending process for home educators

An email from the National Library:

Good afternoon

I would like to inform you of the new process for home educators to use when they request their home educator loans through National Library’s Services to Schools.  I would appreciate if you could please forward this on to your members for their information:

National Library has introduced a new process for requesting home educator loans. This is explained on its website: http://schools.natlib.govt.nz/about/home-educator-loan-requests.

There are two steps to follow:

You can download the forms and then fill them in and send completed forms to National Library by email (servicestoschools@dia.govt.nz) or by post to their Auckland centre (National Library of New Zealand, Private Bag 99936, Newmarket, Auckland 1149).

This new system aligns with National Library’s new lending policy and its school registration and loan request processes.

Based on how the lending service is set up, there is no longer the opportunity for you to walk into the Auckland or Christchurch centres and get books issued. All loan requests must be made by post or email and then resources will be sent out.

Loans need to be returned at the end of each term.  These can be dropped off to the nearest centre (in Auckland or Christchurch) or returned by courier or post. Unfortunately the flat-rate CourierPost service for schools is not available to home educators.

To find out more about home educator entitlements please visithttp://schools.natlib.govt.nz/about/home-educator-loan-requests.

Kind regards

Services to Schools

===============================================================

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

Number of Homeschoolers Growing Nationwide: USA

 

As the dissatisfaction among parents with the U.S. education system grows, so too does the number of homeschoolers in America. Since 1999, the number of children who are being homeschooled has increased by 75%. Although currently the percentage of homeschooled children is only 4% of all school children nationwide, the number of primary school kids whose parents choose to forgo traditional education is growing seven times faster than the number of kids enrolling in K-12 every year.

Despite the growth of homeschooling of late, concerns about the quality of education offered to the kids by their parents persist. But the consistently high placement of homeschooled kids on standardized assessment exams, one of the most celebrated benefits of homeschooling, should be able to put those fears to rest. Homeschooling statistics show that those who are independently educated typically score between the 65th and 89th percentile on such exams, while those attending traditional schools average on the 50th percentile. Furthermore, the achievement gaps, long plaguing school systems around the country, aren’t present in the homeschooling environment. There’s no difference in achievement between sexes, income levels, or race/ethnicity.

Recent studies laud homeschoolers’ academic success, noting their significantly higher ACT-Composite scores as high schoolers and higher grade point averages as college students. Yet surprisingly, the average expenditure for the education of a homeschooled child, per year, is $500 to $600, compared to an average expenditure of $10,000 per child, per year, for public school students.

College recruiters from the best schools in the United States aren’t slow to recognize homeschoolers’ achievements. Those from non-traditional education environments matriculate in colleges and attain a four-year degree at much higher rates than their counterparts from public and even private schools. Homeschoolers are actively recruited by schools like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Stanford University, and Duke.

Nor do homeschoolers miss out on the so-called socialization opportunities, something considered a vital part of a traditional school environment and lacking in those who don’t attend regular schools. But it’s one of the surprising advantages of homeschooling that homeschooled kids tend to be more socially engaged than their peers, and according to the National Home Education Research Institute survey, demonstrate “healthy social, psychological, and emotional development, and success into adulthood.”

Based on recent data, researchers such as Dr. Brian Ray (NHERI.org) “expect to observe a notable surge in the number of children being homeschooled in the next 5 to 10 years. The rise would be in terms of both absolute numbers and percentage of the K to 12 student population. This increase would be in part because . . . [1] a large number of those individuals who were being home educated in the 1990s may begin to homeschool their own school-age children and [2] the continued successes of home-educated students.”

- See more at: http://www.educationnews.org/parenting/number-of-homeschoolers-growing-nationwide/#sthash.cl5zr4mB.dpuf

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

‘I wanted children who loved to learn’

From Stuff.co.nz:

“I home educated for five years. Best five years ever.

“The freedom to choose our own curriculum, and the ability to really drill down into subjects and access top experts within our own time frame inside and outside a 9am-3pm restriction appealed.

‘Anti-social’ was always raised as an objection to home-schooling, yet I noted the most anti-social behaviour I have ever witnessed in society happened in schools, and in prisons, where near 100 per cent of inmates attended state schools at some time.

“My five children were exposed to all age ranges of society rather than confined to ‘same aged peers’ only for six hours a day throughout formative years.

READ MORE:
Home schooling: weird or wonderful?
School’s out, this time forever
‘The children decide what to learn’

“My son was sent to live in France for a year, my daughter opted to learn New Zealand sign language as a core subject. We invited and incorporated members of the local deaf community into our lives and it worked well.

“My 10 year old son wanted to learn C++ programming and html.  He was very proficient in coding at a young age.

“He also took up bagpipes young, and learning to read music just became part of our day.

“Eventually home-schooling for us came to an end. My adult children are all gainfully employed, in healthy relationships, leading fullfilling and productive lives. One son just graduated Otago University as a software engineer.

“The youngest to be home-schooled, and who did not step into a state school classoom until she was 10 years old has her sights set on becoming a geneticist.

“She had an idyllic childhood for the first ten years of her life, roaming farmland with her animals and immersed in books when she was not online and studying with friends over Skype.

“The school environment with mass warehousing of children, where school is primarily occupied with behaviour management, is not the best place for all children. Many thrive outside of institutionalised styles of learning.

“Home education gave us huge flexibility.  Resources and knowledge in the community are limitless.

“I had left school in the early 1980s with no high school qualifications, yet I knew if I exposed them to opportunities and supported them in their quest for education, they would succeed.

“I did not need a teaching degree to give my children wings. ”

Read more here: http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff-nation/assignments/why-did-you-choose-to-home-school/14576513/I-wanted-children-who-loved-to-learn

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading