December 10, 2018

Latest posts from Home Education Foundation

Children should learn mainly through play until age of eight, says Lego

Toy company funds research suggesting educational development can be hindered by early formal schooling. So are UK schools getting it wrong?

A child plays in a nursery.
The Lego Foundation has put £4m into a play professorship at Cambridge University. The first incumbent will be chosen in April Photograph: Gary Calton for the Observer

Parents are squeezing the role of play out of their children’s lives in favour of the three ‘R’s as they try to prepare their offspring for a competitive world, according to the head of Lego’s education charity arm.

A lack of understanding of the value of play is prompting parents and schools alike to reduce it as a priority, says Hanne Rasmussen, head of the Lego Foundation. If parents and governments push children towards numeracy and literacy earlier and earlier, it means they miss out on the early play-based learning that helps to develop creativity, problem-solving and empathy, she says.

According to Rasmussen, the evidence for play-based learning has built enormously over the last decade, but parents don’t know about it. “Both in the formal education system and in the homes of children, the focus on the value of play is rather limited. That’s really something we want to work on – to improve the understanding of the value of play and what play really can do, where more and more it is squeezed by a desire both from the formal system and from parents that children should learn specific literacy and numeracy quite early.”

Read more here: https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/mar/15/children-learn-play-age-eight-lego?CMP=share_btn_fb&fbclid=IwAR0eFlVx17cm5oqq_ifw7_BvlfxlaIewp4I_IKERkcU4nxBcel59SkqDNtA

Home Education Statistics 1998-2017

From the MoE website:

As at 1 July 2017, there were 6,008 home schooled students recorded in the Ministry of Education’s Homeschooling database. These students belong to 3,022 families and represent 0.8% of total school enrolments as at 1 July 2017. Out of the 6,008 homeschoolers 67.3% were the aged 12 or under, 68.3% had been home-schooled for less than 5 years, and only 4.2% had been home-schooled for 10 years or more.

Read more here: https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/statistics/schooling/student-numbers/homeschooling

Homeschooling Students Time Series Downloads: File Type & Size

Homeschooling Turnover

Between 1 July 2016 and 1 July 2017 there was an overall net increase of 171 students; 1,222 students entered into homeschooling and 1,051 students finished homeschooling.

Read more here: https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/statistics/schooling/student-numbers/homeschooling

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

What’s it like to home educate your children?

Currently, 6,000 New Zealand kids are getting homeschooled, not including those enrolled at the correspondence school Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu.

Educating a child at home can allow a parent to “light a fire in their hearts and minds” without pressure or competition, says Siobhan Porter, who has homeschooled all five of her kids.

Siobhan is the director of Auckland Home Educators – a support and advocacy group for homeschoolers.

She and education consultant Natalie Donaldson – who has also homeschooled five kids  – talk to Kathryn Ryan about their experience.

Siobhan Porter of Auckland Home Educators

Siobhan Porter of Auckland Home Educators Photo: Auckland Home Educators

Siobhan Porter had a private school education herself and every advantage, she says.

She hadn’t been exposed to home education at all when she became a mother. (Her children now range in age from 6 to 19.)

“When my oldest was nearly five, I thought ‘actually I don’t really want school to interrupt this lovely thing we’ve got happening here’.”

Siobhan met with some other people who were homeschooling and decided to give it a go.

“I thought ‘surely it can’t be too hard to teach a child to read. I can read myself, I’m not trained to do this but I think I could find out.”

Every child learns differently and as a parent, you have a lot of intuition about what is best for your own child, she says.

“When you can sit alongside your child and connect with them, it’s a wonderful process of them learning and you learning alongside them.

“You’re really lighting a fire in their hearts and minds and helping them to follow their passions.

“You can do that in a really thorough and unhurried way when you’re homeschooling without all that pressure and competition.

“They do this great learning but they still have heaps of time to play, explore, create and imagine.”

Natalie, whose kids now range in age between 11 and 19, also had no intention of educating her kids at home until it became clear her 5-year-old son was going to find school a big challenge.

She and her partner gave it a try for educational reasons, but didn’t realise it would also be “a great family thing it was to do”, she says.

“We didn’t realise it would give us the opportunity to be together as a family, to grow to know each other and to actually quite like each other in a way I didn’t realise you could do as a family.”

In New Zealand, homeschoolers don’t have to follow the New Zealand school curriculum and people take many different approaches to their kids’ education, Natalie says.

“Learning isn’t about reaching a particular milestone at a particular age. It’s about progressing along a continuum and gaining those skills as you are able and interested.

“If a child is illiterate at age 10 or 11 it does not mean they will have a poor education outcome long-term if a family is committed to [their education].

“If you take the institution out of learning, children just have this wonderful freedom and curiosity to learn.”

Homeschooled kids don’t have to miss out socially, she says.

“Children don’t have to be around 20 or 30 other children to be well-socialised. They do need a few good friends and they need to see those friends regularly.”

Auckland Home Educators hosts an event every term where kids can experience the wider community of homeschoolers, she says.

But people educating their kids at home also have to use initiative and create their own community, she says.

“You have to be proactive about seeking out those families at the same age and stage in your area that you can meet with regularly.”

When they’re reading for formal schooling, home-schooled children are generally well-grounded, she says.

“They really know who they are, they know their family, they know their family culture and values.”

One of the biggest challenges of home-schooling is living on one income, she says.

“There’s a lot of families who are on quite humble incomes who find creative ways to make homeschooling work for them.”

As a parent, more mess and clutter in the house and fewer breaks from your kids can be challenging, too, she says.

Natalie concedes homeschooling isn’t the right option for everyone, but sometimes the positive outcomes can take time to be revealed.

“It can look like [the child is] doing nothing in the early years, but inevitably, in the long run, these familes do extremely well.”

You can get more information about home education at the Ministry of Education website.

Radio New Zealand:

https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018669313/what-s-it-like-to-homeschool-your-kids

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

GET THEM OUT!

Craig used to say this all the time. Infact we had a slogan printed out with just these words: Get them out!

From Doug Wilson’s blog today

INTRODUCTION:

“H.L. Mencken suggested a shrewd educational reform that has somehow not caught on. He said that there was nothing wrong with our current education establishment that could not be fixed by burning all the schools, and hanging all the teachers. Now some might want to dismiss this as an extreme measure, but visionaries are often dismissed in their own day. “You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one . . .”

GET THEM OUT NOW:

“I do have an idea, followed by a question. Millions of evangelicals still have their children in the government school system. Get them out now. Having Christian children in the government school system is what theologians of another era would have called sinnity-sin-sin. Not a little smidge of sinnity either.[1] Not really a debatable matter. Stop it. Crash the system. If there ever were to be a true reformation among us, Christians leaving the public school system would form a refugee column that would make the Mississippi River look like a solitary tear running down Horace Mann’s cheek.

“My question is a simple one, but I will divide it into two questions in just a moment. Here is the first phase of the question:

“In order for all Christians to get their kids out of the maw of this government school system, what would it take precisely? How many outrages would have to be slathered over the tops of all of our heads before we said something like, “Friend, enough”? How outrageous would such outrages have to get before somebody noticed? How much before everybody noticed?

“How far down this wormhole do we have to go?

“Some time, away in the future, the last holdout, some Baptist deacon in Tennessee, will finally acknowledge that when the public school system refused to allow his (politely worded) request for his daughter to opt out of the lab for the pole dancing class, with the football team as the practice audience, they really had “gone too far.” The football team was there because they were all in mandatory sensitivity training, which meant that they had to watch the girls without any catcalling, which they did grumble about a little bit.

“Here is how the question divides. What it would take in 2018 is a very different question than what it will take twenty years from now, in 2038. The reason I know this is because what it would have taken in 1998, and before that in 1978, is quite different from what it would take now. Decadence, as Augustine once put it, is a conveyor belt that has no off switch. Things that pass without comment today would have caused riots forty years ago. And that which would cause riots today is what you are prepping your great-grandchildren to eventually put up with, provided they learn your evasions.

“If you boil a frog slowly enough, as the adage has it, he will let you do it. If they are evangelical frogs, you can boil the whole Nile, with all of them in it. On a summer evening you can hear them croaking their praise choruses.

“Can anybody imagine a school in 1958 where drag queens were in charge of the library reading hour? Can anybody imagine John Knox writing a stern letter to the school board about it, and speaking in opposition for his allotted three minutes at the public hearing that was scheduled for it? While you are at it, try to imagine him going up to the lectern with mincing step and simpering into the microphone.

THE HEART OF OUR COMPROMISE:

“This is the diseased heart of our great compromise. This is the Baal-grove out in front of Gideon’s house. The sound of revival would be the sound of multiple chain saws firing up. If it doesn’t smell like burning oil, and if it doesn’t sound like those chain saws, it isn’t revival.

“Get them out now.”

READ MORE HERE: https://dougwils.com/books-and-culture/s7-engaging-the-culture/burn-all-the-schools.html?platform=hootsuite

Well worth reading this blog to the end.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Listen to Radio New Zealand Thursday, 1 Nov, 11.20am

Make sure you listen to an interview about homeschooling on Radio New Zealand tomorrow (Thursday), 1 November 2018, at 11.20am. Kathryn Ryan on the Nine to Noon programme will be talking to Siobhan Porter and Natalie Donaldson from AHE (Auckland Home Educators). It should be really good – show your support and listen in!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

2018 Essay Contest

Submit your essay contest entries by November 1.
We have a job for your student! Have him or her describe an ideal career in the past, present, or future, and maybe win a cash prize! HSLDA’s homeschool essay contest will be accepting entries through November 1.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Govt Should Talk to Parents First regarding Sex Education

 
YOUR RIGHTS AS PARENTS

Hi Barbara

The Education Review Office (ERO) released a report yesterday about “sexuality education”. Once again, this latest government report raises way more concerns for parents than reassurances, and joins the queue of governmental and radical groups who want to indoctrinate your children with sexual propaganda without consulting you – the parents. It is also significant that the President of the Secondary Principals Association said that parents have a responsibility to do this rather than teachers.

Please take a moment to read our media release, and also the additional information we have provided for parents. Ultimately it’s about parents being able to make an informed choice, and to be consulted and respected!
ERO Should Talk To Parents First About Sex Ed
Media Release 12 September 2018 
Family First NZ says that the Education Review Office should talk to parents first before issuing reports about sexuality education in schools. Family First also questions why words such as “abstinence”, “delay”, “moral”, and “marriage” have been left out of guidelines for school.

The review acknowledges that the best outcomes are achieved when trustees and school leaders consult with the school community, and the parents being able to have ‘meaningful input into the content and delivery’ of any programmes. The report also admitted that ‘very few schools reported to parents on sexuality education achievement. Consequently, evaluation of sexuality education provision, when it did occur, focused mostly on what had been delivered, rather than learning outcomes for students.’

READ THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION’S “GLOSSARY OFTERMS” A glossary of ‘useful sexuality terms’ for sexuality education!
“The government is currently pursuing and promoting a curriculum where children are indoctrinated on ‘gender identity’ ideology and the harms of gender stereotypes, and given dangerous messages that they’re sexual from birth, that the proper time for sexual activity is when they feel ready, and that they have rights to pleasure, birth control, and abortion. Most schools, along with parents in that school community, are rejecting the extreme elements of the sexuality education guidelines, which probably explains why so many schools aren’t delivering them,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.“Parents also object to these programmes targeted at children which undermine the role and values of parents, and resources which fail to take into account the emotional and physical development of each child and the values of that particular family.”

“Yes, pornography viewing by young people is absolutely a major concern for parents, but what parents are crying out for is resources and an understanding of the technology, the risks, and of how to protect their children. They want their children to know that it is wrong and to be discouraged from viewing it. It is not just a topic for discussion, devoid of any moral framework or direction.”

In a 2017 independent nationwide poll of 846 people undertaken by Curia Market Research, 4 out of 5 parents said they are confident of their ability to teach their own children about sex and sexuality issues, and 2/3’rds believe that parents should be dictating any school-based teaching, not the government or groups such as Family Planning and Rainbow Youth.

“This polling is a clear rebuke to the current government approach of developing curriculum with minimal input from parents. Parents know their children the best and should determine the best timing and most appropriate way to tackle topics such as keeping themselves safe, consent, and ‘where do babies come from’. A valueless ‘one size fits all’ approach is far too simplistic and can even be harmful,” says Mr McCoskrie.

“Studies show that the biggest protective factors for coping with puberty and sexual involvement are married parents, family values, parental supervision, and parental expectations for behaviour. What happens at home is the greatest determinant of the outcomes for the young person. There seems to be a basic and ironic assumption that parents know nothing about sex and that only Family Planning and Rainbow Youth do. This is a myth and is rejected by Kiwi parents.”

Family First released a report in 2013 “R18: Sexuality Education in New Zealand – A Critical Review” by US psychiatrist Dr Miriam Grossman which was sent to all school principals and all Board of Trustee Chairpersons of Intermediate and Secondary schools in NZ. Dr Grossman warned that the sex education resources fail to tell the full facts and compromise the concerns and wishes of parents, and the safety of young people. “A premise of modern sex education is that young people have the right to make their own decisions about sexual activity, and no judging is allowed. Risky behaviours are normalised and even celebrated. Children and adolescents are introduced to sexual activities their parents would prefer they not even know about, let alone practice. It’s reasonable to ask: is the ‘comprehensive sexuality education’ foisted on young people all over the world about sexual health, or sexual licence?” says Dr Grossman
ENDS

YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT re SEX ED AT SCHOOLS
MATES AND DATES INFORMATION HANDBOOK
Opting Out – It is important to note that as with all programmes like this (and also Mindfulness), parents can withdraw their children from Mates & Dates classes. See page 61 of the Handbook (above).

CONCLUSION
Unless you can absolutely guarantee
that your school leadership is adopting a “first do no harm” policy with sexuality education (and Mindfulness, for that matter), is regularly consulting with you and other parents in the school community, AND can guarantee that groups like Family Planning and Rainbow Youth aren’t being allowed access to the classroom to push their propaganda, then we would recommend withdrawing your child. ‘Hoping for the best’ may not be worth the risk!

But ultimately, we believe parents should be able to make an informed choice on what’s best for their child – and not be forced to cowtow to ideology being pushed by the State which is flawed and, in many cases, harmful.

Kind regards.

Bob McCoskrie
National Director

READ OUR ISSUES PAPER ON “MINDFULNESS”
READ OUR MEMO TO ALL SCHOOL PRINCIPALS RE “INSIDE OUT”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Registrations now OPEN for HEART Northland 2018

The 2018 registrations are now OPEN for HEART Northland

Please click on the link  ‘Registrations’ for all the info!

 

Registration 2018

Find below a link to PDF of the 2018 Brochure or click on each picture below to view a larger image of the information

BROCHURE HEART 2018

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Huge List of Free Homeschool Printable Sites

As part of The Chaos and The Clutter 5 part series on Frugal Homeschooling, they are sharing a reference list for finding the best online printables for free or almost free. Using printables, you can create an entire curriculum that will fit with many types of homeschooling.Huge List of Free Homeschool Printable SitesClick on the link above or here to get to the Huge List of Free Homeschool Printable Sites

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

Andrew Pudewa Conference NZ 2018

Andrew Pudewa (founder and director of the Institute of Excellence in Writing, expert speaker on issues relating to teaching, writing, thinking, spelling, and music, equipper of educators, and general inspirer and encourager of Home Educators) is in New Zealand in August 2018.

Look out for him at a place near you and don’t miss hearing him!

Christchurch, August 10-11
Palmerston North, August 13
New Plymouth, August 14
Taupo, August 15
Tauranga, August 16
Auckland, August 17-18

“These conferences should have been compulsory!”

When Andrew Pudewa visited New Zealand in 2008, this is what one enthusiastic home educator had to say after she attended his conference in Palmerston North.

“These conferences in New Zealand should have been compulsory for all home educators in New Zealand to attend. I highly recommend them that much. Every one of his sessions was fantastic. Some made me want to do more of his courses so that I could find out a lot more.”

For more information about talks, times, prices and venues, click here for Conference Details and more on the location you are interested in.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

SaveSave

HEART 2018

The HEART 2018 BROCHURE IS OUT and the line-up of speakers & activities are well worth the wait!
Registrations are now OPEN
Please feel free to share the brochure with any Home schooling Mum you think might be interested in a weekend of refreshment and encouragement.

Image may contain: one or more people and text

Image may contain: text

Image may contain: one or more people, hat and text

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

Taratahi Agriculture Training School

A note from Gwenda Smithies

I thought you might be interested in putting the following info out to NZ homeschoolers…

Last year we discovered Taratahi Agriculture Training School.  They offer distance learning courses in agriculture and their courses give you NCEA credits.  You can choose whether you want to do level 1, 2 or 3 courses.  Our son did sufficient level 3 credits (14 credits) to gain an entire subject for the purposes of University Entrance.  You don’t have to have done levels 1 and 2 before level 3.  Our son went straight to level 3 and the material was straightforward.

Taratahi post out all required materials and offer a wide range of agriculture areas to choose from  – for example you can study sheep breeding, how to improve soil health, recognizing common pasture plants and lots of other things.  You can do as many or as few courses as you want.  It is totally flexible and the workload required for each course is not high.  There is a cost but it is not unreasonable.  We were their first ever homeschoolers but they liked the experience of having homeschoolers!  They have now streamlined a process to make it easier for other homeschoolers to get qualifications and credits in agriculture.  We think this is a brilliant option for homeschoolers.  Their website is https://www.taratahi.ac.nz/programmes/primary-industries-in-schools  This site contains all the various options for secondary school-age students.  You will notice that they also offer some pretty cool on-farm courses but these practical courses are not available in all parts of New Zealand, however we can certainly all access the many distance-learning options (scroll to the bottom of the page on that site to find the distance learning section).

Regards, Gwenda Smithies rgsmithies@xtra.co.nz

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading