July 26, 2016

Latest posts from Home Education Foundation

ENGAGE 2016

Info on Engage Conference in Christchurch:

Hi All,

Just to let you know registrations are now open for ENGAGE 2016 (flyer attached) the Family Discipleship and Home Education Conference to be held again in ChCh this coming August 12-13. Spaces are limited, and registration is essential. To register please visit www.engageconference.org.nz. Please let us know if you want any flyers/posters.

Kind regards,
Kris Baines

ENGAGE POSTER

Click on photo to enlarge

What People Said About ENGAGE 2015….

“Thank you for organising and running Engage 2015. It was a great refresher and refocus for us and I feel that we will implement and mull on the things talked of during the conference to enrich our relationship with God, our marriage, our relationship with our children and our homeschooling journey.”

“Thank you so much for such a wonderful conference.  We had not expected to be so blessed, but we loved it and found it so refreshing.  It was such a treat to be there.  Even the younger children enjoyed it (as an example, 9 year old said afterwards, “I love conferences”).  Thank you so much for everything you put into making this such a fantastic event.  May the Lord reward you.

“Congratulations on the awesome conference you and your team pulled off this weekend…really appreciated the tips on
discipling our children and hearing the many wonderful speakers”.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Family of six to spend a year on a bus, filming a child abuse documentary

'We're committed to doing it and we'll find a way to fund it,' says Chris Lane, back right. He's pictured with wife ...

GEORGE HEARD/FAIRFAX NZ

‘We’re committed to doing it and we’ll find a way to fund it,’ says Chris Lane, back right. He’s pictured with wife Erinna and kids, from left, Theodore, 4, Lachie, 6, Joshua, 8, and Noah, 8.

Erinna and Chris Lane, of Te Awamutu, plan to pack up their life and take their family on a documentary-making mission.

The pair run Big Kid Productions and are taking their skills to the road to show what ordinary Kiwis can do to prevent child abuse.

“What we can do is we can make a film. So that’s what we’re going to try to do… It’s just about getting people to actually do something,” Chris said.

“Actual tangible change rather than clicking outrage on Facebook, which doesn’t actually change anything.”

Their project, which starts in October,  has been dubbed Stop The Bus and the aim is to produce a 90-minute film, with ongoing updates for social media.

Their four boys - Joshua, Noah, Lachie and Theodore – are reportedly super keen on the adventure.

“We’re just everyday, ordinary, ‘normal’ New Zealanders and we’re going to put our family on a bus for a year,” Erinna said.?

They’ll be looking for people who are making their communities stronger and already have a list of suggestions.

A bus will be the Lanes’ home for the time on the road but they’re still working on getting one.

They’ve spent about six months on research, including working with Child Matters, and have been visited by MPs.

“We’re committed to doing it and we’ll find a way to fund it,” Chris said.

Erinna and Chris started Big Kid Productions off with mostly wedding work, although they more recently made music videos for Avalanche City.

They’ve wanted to get into some film and documentary work for themselves for a while so Stop The Bus is that project.

“It’s quite a big deal and we don’t know how much money we will have to live or anything at the moment,” Erinna said.

“But we really believe in it so we’re going to do it regardless.”

Child abuse isn’t a positive topic but the Lanes want to make a documentary that will empower people to do something.

?”A lot of the documentaries that are out there are quite shocking and focus on the negative stuff,” Erinna said.

People featured in the film may not necessarily be dealing directly with child abuse, but could be working with at risk kids or helping a sports club create young leaders.

Chris is in charge of filming and editing, and hopes he’ll find space to work on their bus.

He describes Erinna as the “critical eye” and manager, but she’ll also be busy home schooling the boys.

Her vision for the documentary was to have people all across New Zealand linking arms to take ownership of the child abuse issue – a gesture too big to ignore.

So, in each place they visit, they’ll give people the chance to link up in front of some iconic local scenery.

Two other major aims of their documentary are to show child abuse exists across the board, not just in some sectors of society, and to give people ideas about what they can do to prevent it.

Outrage alone isn’t going to do it, Chris said.

“Everyone got enraged [about the deaths of the Kahui twins] and now we’ve got Moko 10 years later and everyone’s enraged.”?

The Lanes have been working with Child Matters, who will be their subject matter experts.

They are also supported by law firm Tompkins Wake and are hoping to set Stop The Bus up as a charitable organisation.

To support the project, visit givealittle.co.nz/cause/stopthebus#

 - Stuff - http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/inspire-me/81717427/family-of-six–to-spend-a-year-on-a-bus-filming-a-child-abuse-documentary

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Home Education Awareness Week (HEAW) 17 to 22 October 2016

Home Education Awareness Week (HEAW) 17 – 22 October 2016

Home Educators all over the country use this as an opportunity to do something special to raise their profile locally and develop a bit of positive public relations. This helps in gaining the movement a bit more credibility, especially when applying for grants or discounts with resource suppliers, or for admission to tertiary institutions or gaining help and advice from schools and perhaps even the use of some of their resources. And of course the benefits would be examined by more people, thereby bringing more people into the home schooling movement and your local support group.

For more information on HEAW go to: http://hef.org.nz/2007/home-education-awareness-week/

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

HEART Retreat: 24-26 June 2016

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

New doco says NZ education system is ‘grossly unfair’

Documentary maker Bryan Bruce says the government could do better for our children.

Bryan Bruce is not afraid to ask the big questions whether he is looking at child poverty or the growing divide between rich and poor. The Scottish-born Kiwi filmmaker, who was responsible for the documentaries Mind The Gapand Inside Child Poverty, is now putting New Zealand’s education system under the microscope.

In his documentary, World Class? Inside NZ Education: A Special Report, Bryan, a former teacher, looks at what he believes are some fundamental problems in schools.

He is critical of the reforms, known as Tomorrow’s Schools, which started in the 1980s in which schools became self-managing.

 ”So what happened in 1987 is the politicians got involved and thought ‘We know better than the teachers. We’re going to get involved and every school will manage itself and we’ll have these boards.’

READ MORE:
*Depression among Kiwi students a ‘crisis’
*Learning hubs to help steer M?ori to NCEA Level 2
*Marlborough colleges visit Christchurch for co-location ideas

“What happened is that schools in rich areas did really well because they had accountants and lawyers on their boards and schools in poor areas didn’t do well because they didn’t have the capacity to pull in money and all of that. What we’ve really ended up with is an apartheid system of education. Our system of education is grossly unfair.

“Every child who enters the public system of education should have the same right not just to enter it but to actually succeed in it and that’s not the case.

“If education was a reality game show I’d be giving out roses to the teachers and voting treasury off the island. I’d be telling the ministry that if they don’t help teachers more, they’ll be next to go.”

For his documentary Bryan travels to New York, China and Finland to compare their education systems with New Zealand’s. He also shines the spotlight on South Auckland’s Manurewa Intermediate, a decile one school he says is “one of the best schools in the country”.

“It’s run by an incredible principal called Iain Taylor. They have a discovery approach where you will find what the child is interested in and then you will teach from that position. So if a kid likes motorbikes you start there. They read about motorbikes. The idea is to develop a passion for learning.

“If you keep testing children on knowledge, you drive that passion for learning out of them.”

World Class? Inside NZ Education: A Special Report - TV3, May 24

 - TV Guide

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

Home Education Information Evening: Hamilton

image

===============================================================

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Exciting news from Canterbury University for Home Educators

Great news from Canterbury University
Home-school Student Award
Hi,

 I’d like to bring to your attention some recent work we have been doing at the University of Canterbury clarifying progression to university for home-school students. There are several pathways for home-school students to gain admission to UC for degree level study, which are outlined on a new web page we have created. Also for the first time UC Arts is offering a College Award especially for home-school students, which is tied to one of those pathways.

 UC Arts is offering home-schooled students the opportunity to receive a College Award of $3000 towards fees in their first year of full time study in a BA, MusB, or BFA.

 Please contact us if you would like to discuss ways that we can promote this offer to home-school students through your networks, or if you have questions about the College Award or the STAR programme.

For any enquiries about Special Admission or the STAR Programme please contact:
Franka Menzies, Academic Processes Co-ordinator 
franka.menzies@canterbury.ac.nz

For any enquiries about the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music or the UC Arts Home-School College Awards contact:
College of Arts Student Advisors 
artsdegreeadvice@canterbury.ac.nz

 Regards

Tim Winfield
Marketing and Outreach Coordinator
College of Arts, University of Canterbury
Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
Tel: +64 3 364 2987 ext 6756, Room 409, Karl Popper Building (view map)
www.arts.canterbury.ac.nz FollowUC Arts:

 

===============================================================

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

National Library registration and lending process for home educators

An email from the National Library:

Good afternoon

I would like to inform you of the new process for home educators to use when they request their home educator loans through National Library’s Services to Schools.  I would appreciate if you could please forward this on to your members for their information:

National Library has introduced a new process for requesting home educator loans. This is explained on its website: http://schools.natlib.govt.nz/about/home-educator-loan-requests.

There are two steps to follow:

You can download the forms and then fill them in and send completed forms to National Library by email (servicestoschools@dia.govt.nz) or by post to their Auckland centre (National Library of New Zealand, Private Bag 99936, Newmarket, Auckland 1149).

This new system aligns with National Library’s new lending policy and its school registration and loan request processes.

Based on how the lending service is set up, there is no longer the opportunity for you to walk into the Auckland or Christchurch centres and get books issued. All loan requests must be made by post or email and then resources will be sent out.

Loans need to be returned at the end of each term.  These can be dropped off to the nearest centre (in Auckland or Christchurch) or returned by courier or post. Unfortunately the flat-rate CourierPost service for schools is not available to home educators.

To find out more about home educator entitlements please visithttp://schools.natlib.govt.nz/about/home-educator-loan-requests.

Kind regards

Services to Schools

===============================================================

Please share this information with other home educators and home education groups you are in

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

Number of Homeschoolers Growing Nationwide: USA

 

As the dissatisfaction among parents with the U.S. education system grows, so too does the number of homeschoolers in America. Since 1999, the number of children who are being homeschooled has increased by 75%. Although currently the percentage of homeschooled children is only 4% of all school children nationwide, the number of primary school kids whose parents choose to forgo traditional education is growing seven times faster than the number of kids enrolling in K-12 every year.

Despite the growth of homeschooling of late, concerns about the quality of education offered to the kids by their parents persist. But the consistently high placement of homeschooled kids on standardized assessment exams, one of the most celebrated benefits of homeschooling, should be able to put those fears to rest. Homeschooling statistics show that those who are independently educated typically score between the 65th and 89th percentile on such exams, while those attending traditional schools average on the 50th percentile. Furthermore, the achievement gaps, long plaguing school systems around the country, aren’t present in the homeschooling environment. There’s no difference in achievement between sexes, income levels, or race/ethnicity.

Recent studies laud homeschoolers’ academic success, noting their significantly higher ACT-Composite scores as high schoolers and higher grade point averages as college students. Yet surprisingly, the average expenditure for the education of a homeschooled child, per year, is $500 to $600, compared to an average expenditure of $10,000 per child, per year, for public school students.

College recruiters from the best schools in the United States aren’t slow to recognize homeschoolers’ achievements. Those from non-traditional education environments matriculate in colleges and attain a four-year degree at much higher rates than their counterparts from public and even private schools. Homeschoolers are actively recruited by schools like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Stanford University, and Duke.

Nor do homeschoolers miss out on the so-called socialization opportunities, something considered a vital part of a traditional school environment and lacking in those who don’t attend regular schools. But it’s one of the surprising advantages of homeschooling that homeschooled kids tend to be more socially engaged than their peers, and according to the National Home Education Research Institute survey, demonstrate “healthy social, psychological, and emotional development, and success into adulthood.”

Based on recent data, researchers such as Dr. Brian Ray (NHERI.org) “expect to observe a notable surge in the number of children being homeschooled in the next 5 to 10 years. The rise would be in terms of both absolute numbers and percentage of the K to 12 student population. This increase would be in part because . . . [1] a large number of those individuals who were being home educated in the 1990s may begin to homeschool their own school-age children and [2] the continued successes of home-educated students.”

- See more at: http://www.educationnews.org/parenting/number-of-homeschoolers-growing-nationwide/#sthash.cl5zr4mB.dpuf

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

‘I wanted children who loved to learn’

From Stuff.co.nz:

“I home educated for five years. Best five years ever.

“The freedom to choose our own curriculum, and the ability to really drill down into subjects and access top experts within our own time frame inside and outside a 9am-3pm restriction appealed.

‘Anti-social’ was always raised as an objection to home-schooling, yet I noted the most anti-social behaviour I have ever witnessed in society happened in schools, and in prisons, where near 100 per cent of inmates attended state schools at some time.

“My five children were exposed to all age ranges of society rather than confined to ‘same aged peers’ only for six hours a day throughout formative years.

READ MORE:
Home schooling: weird or wonderful?
School’s out, this time forever
‘The children decide what to learn’

“My son was sent to live in France for a year, my daughter opted to learn New Zealand sign language as a core subject. We invited and incorporated members of the local deaf community into our lives and it worked well.

“My 10 year old son wanted to learn C++ programming and html.  He was very proficient in coding at a young age.

“He also took up bagpipes young, and learning to read music just became part of our day.

“Eventually home-schooling for us came to an end. My adult children are all gainfully employed, in healthy relationships, leading fullfilling and productive lives. One son just graduated Otago University as a software engineer.

“The youngest to be home-schooled, and who did not step into a state school classoom until she was 10 years old has her sights set on becoming a geneticist.

“She had an idyllic childhood for the first ten years of her life, roaming farmland with her animals and immersed in books when she was not online and studying with friends over Skype.

“The school environment with mass warehousing of children, where school is primarily occupied with behaviour management, is not the best place for all children. Many thrive outside of institutionalised styles of learning.

“Home education gave us huge flexibility.  Resources and knowledge in the community are limitless.

“I had left school in the early 1980s with no high school qualifications, yet I knew if I exposed them to opportunities and supported them in their quest for education, they would succeed.

“I did not need a teaching degree to give my children wings. ”

Read more here: http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff-nation/assignments/why-did-you-choose-to-home-school/14576513/I-wanted-children-who-loved-to-learn

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Class of their own: Home-schooling a ‘path of discovery’

Seven per cent of New Zealand’s school population are taught at home. Last year, 5558 children from nearly 3000 families were home-schooled.Education reporter Jody O’Callaghan meets a North Canterbury home-educating family.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/76178455/class-of-their-own-homeschooling-a-path-of-discovery

Scargill mother Lennie Harrison has been home-schooling her four children for 27 years.

As 10-year-old James is head down studying, the smell of pancakes wafts from the griddle nearby.

Lennie Harrison, home schooling James, 10, and Jasmine,18.

John Kirk-Anderson

Lennie Harrison, home schooling James, 10, and Jasmine,18.

A floor to ceiling shelf packed with books covers one side of the living room, and two wooden desks are lined up along the window.

“Learning at its best is a lifestyle,” Lennie Harrison said.

Canterbury has the third largest home-school community of 764, after Auckland’s 1214, and Waikato’s 818. Home-school parents need approval and regular checks from the Ministry of Education, and must educate their children to the standard they would receive at a registered school.

Harrison said home-schooling mothers often joked they did not get holidays, using every opportunity for learning as a family.

“Take the child by the hand and walk the educational path with them. It’s a path of discovery.”

Harrison designed her own curriculum to suit each child, but it was much easier to gather resources now with the internet than 30 years ago.

“There’s just so much around you just can’t go short.”

“We already have a modern learning environment, we have our house, and outside the house, which is the rest of the world.”

If the family lacked equipment needed for a lesson, she cast the net among friends. If her skills did not extend to a certain subject, she could “swap children” with other home-schoolers needing her specific skills.

Many home-schooled their children through desperation – a child bullied, or their special needs not met in a normal school setting.

For her, “cockiness helps” in making the decision she could educate her children better than mainstream schooling.

“I think I’m made to swim against the tide.”

Christianity played a part too.

She was often asked, ’What about socialisation?’ and ‘What about qualifications?”

They frequently met with about 10 home-educating families in North Canterbury – about 50 children.

At 14, the Harrison children should be able to plan out their day, and start doing voluntary community work to build up their curriculum vitae.

Daughter Jasmine volunteered at a school and a rest home, both for six months.

By 16 they should be full-time – either studying, working, or part-time in each.

Now at 18, “life costs” for Jasmine.

“There’s no more mucking around,” she said.

Jasmine completed level 2 when she was 16, and was now doing NCEA level 3 in classics via correspondence, while doing legal papers through Open Polytechnic. She was also still volunteering.

The ministry paid Harrison $740 to teach a child annually. When their home schooling ended, her children paid a bit of rent and food money, course costs, and car or hobby costs.

Harrison tried being the anxious mother with son Jake, now 32, “waving flags and whistles”, using rewards and punishments, “but you can’t work against a personality”. He needed more space.

He eventually found his feet in electrical engineering, gaining a degree at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) after completing an electrician apprenticeship.

Going to polytechnic at 21 was the first time he stepped foot in a classroom.

“I didn’t feel like I was handicapped or anything.”

His two children would also be home-schooled.

For daughter Sargia, now 28, joining the workforce as a librarian in Wellington was a “really smooth transition”.

“It was mostly a breeze. I think [home-schooling] really allowed me to discover who I was without outside pressure.”

 - Stuff

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Update from the National Library

Tena koe Barbara

Please find below an update on the lending service.

We would appreciate it if you could circulate this update to others within the Home Education Foundation.

Our vision is that all young people have access to effective and connected library services and library learning environments that support their development as readers and digitally literate learners.

Services to Schools Update: 4 March 2016

In this update

  • Update on the lending service

Update on the lending service

We have had more than 1,200 schools register for National Library’s new lending service and so far have sent out more than 61,000 items to schools that have put in requests.

We are really pleased with the uptake with approximately half of New Zealand schools already registered for our new service.

We have had positive feedback from school staff who are enjoying their loans, however, there are a number of schools still in the queue to receive their loans.

We are working as fast as we can to complete the loans in the queue and advised schools today when they can expect their loans.

For schools receiving their loans later than expected we are offering an extended loan period so they can retain their resources for another term. As well, they will be entitled to request another full Term 2 loan. Both loans will then be due back at the end of Term 2.

More information

If you have any questions please visit our website www.schools.natlib.govt.nz  or email S2Stransformation@dia.govt.nz.

Regards

Geraldine Howell

Director Literacy Learning Public Programmes, National Library

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading