March 23, 2017

Latest posts from Home Education Foundation

Homeschooling is the smartest way to teach kids in the 21st century

Alison Davis doesn’t see homeschooling as some strange alternative to traditional school.

If anything, says the mum from Williamstown, New Jersey, when it comes to raising her two children, she’s doing the sensible thing.

“You’re not going to be put in a work environment where everybody came from the same school and everybody is the same age,” she tells Business Insider. “In my opinion, the traditional school atmosphere is not the real world at all.”

Homeschooling, she says, that’s the real world.

Davis’ satisfaction with keeping her kids out of local public and private schools is one shared by a growing pool of parents around the US. Recent data collected by the Department of Education reveals homeschooling has grown by 61.8% over the last 10 years to the point where two million kids — 4% of the total youth population — now learn from the comfort of their own home.

Contrary to the belief that homeschooling produces anti-social outcasts, the truth is that some of the most high-achieving, well-adjusted students are poring over maths problems at their kitchen table, not a desk in a classroom. According to leading pedagogical research, at-home instruction may just be the most relevant, responsible, and effective way to educate children in the 21st century.

Personalisation is key

In his 2015 book “Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education,” veteran teacher and beloved TED speaker Ken Robinson emphasises that students learn best at their preferred speeds and in their preferred manner. “All students are unique individuals with their own hopes, talents, anxieties, fears, passions, and aspirations,” he writes. “Engaging them as individuals is the heart of raising achievement.”

Robinson wasn’t referring to homeschooling directly, but he might as well have been. No form of education is designed to foster more personalised tutelage.

While traditional schools try their best to tailor lesson plans to individual students, teachers often still end up teaching to the middle. There are simply too many kids learning at different speeds for teachers to give each of them exactly what they need. Homeschooling, meanwhile, is personal by design.

Davis says her son Luke struggled early on with reading. Even into the second grade, he didn’t enjoy it and found it overwhelming. In any other school, teachers may not have been able to spend the necessary time helping Luke become a stronger reader because they had 20 other kids to worry about. That’s not the case in the Davis household.

“I could take that extra time with him,” Davis says. Plus, reading time became more than just a push toward literacy; it was Mummy-Luke bonding time — something no school could compete with. “Now he devours books in like a week’s time or less,” she says.

The long-term effects of personalisation are equally massive. According to a 2009 study of standardised testing, homeschoolers scored in the 86th percentile. The results held true even when controlling for parents’ income level, amount of education, teaching credentials, and level of state regulation. Research also suggests that homeschooled kids get into college more often and do better once they’re enrolled.

No, homeschooling doesn’t create recluses

The biggest stereotype surrounding homeschooling is that constant one-on-one teaching deprives kids of the socialisation they need to thrive. Not so. Homeschooled kids are just as likely to play soccer and do group projects as any other students.

Davis’ family is heavily involved in their local church, so Luke and his older sister Amanda both have friends in the choir. They both play an instrument, so they have friends in a homeschooler orchestra. They hang with kids on their block. Amanda has a pen pal who lives in Arizona. As far as childhood goes, theirs is pretty run-of-the-mill.

It’s not just that homeschooled kids enjoy the upside of normal school, though; they also get to enjoy the absence of its many drawbacks — namely peer pressure and cliques. On several occasions, Alison says, other kids have expressed jealousy that Luke and Amanda get to learn at home, away from the social hierarchies of normal school.

“They’re like, Aw man, I wish I got be homeschooled,” she says. “I’ve been very surprised by it.”

Of course, some parents do struggle to help their kids make friends.

Earlier this year, I interviewed an extremely bright 7-year-old named Akash who lives in San Angelo, Texas. He’s homeschooled because a child psychologist who studied him when he was a toddler told his parents it was probably the smartest option.

Akash’s best friend — maybe his only friend — is his big sister, Amrita. Most of the kids in his nearby homeschoolers’ association are either too old or too dissimilar in personality for his parents to schedule regular playdates, even though Akash is silly and outgoing.

But even for kids who do struggle, trends suggest the Internet is making it easier. A Pew survey from last year revealed that 55% of all teens say they regularly spend time with friends online or through social media, and 45% say they meet through extracurriculars, sports, or hobbies, which suggests classrooms aren’t the only way to make friends.
Read more at https://www.businessinsider.com/why-kids-should-get-homeschooled-2016-8#KuPvto74MgLXWPsz.99

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

AHE Conference 2017

AHE Learning Together Conference

Saturday 20 May, 9 am – 5 pm
Raye Freedman Arts Centre, Epsom Girls’ Grammar School

Come and join us for an inspirational day of encouragement, ideas and networking to help you in your home-schooling journey.  The AHE Learning Together Conference is a ‘locally produced’ event designed to help parents on their home-schooling journey.  Whether you’re investigating home-schooling as an option for your child, or have been underway for many years -there’s something for everyone!

Home-schooling is a great way to set a family culture.  It’s a way to bond to one another, to hold to each other, to create a kind of community with each other that can withstand even the hardest stuff.

My home-school success is not based on my children’s achievement in maths or writing.  But in my ability to stay connected to the people my children are, not who I hope they will be.  Allow your home-school life to create space for discovery…

from Julie Bogart, creator and owner Brave Writer

We will have main speakers, plenty of workshops to choose from, time to talk with other home-schooling parents, and peruse available vendors.

TIMETABLE

8.00 am  Registrations open
9.00 am  Keynote speaker: Kate Jaunay
Once Upon a Time – a Home-Educating Story
10.00 am Morning tea and Vendors
10.45 am Session 1 – Workshops (1 hour)
12.00 pm Session 2 – Workshops (1 hour)
1.00 pm   Lunch and Vendors
2.00 pm   Keynote speaker: Siobhan Porter
Creating a Community for Yourself and Your Children
2.45 pm   Panel: Dads
3.30 pm   Session 3 – Workshops (1 hour)
5.00 pm   Finish

2017 is the 20th Anniversary for Auckland Home Educators.  Home-schooling is alive and well in Auckland – yay – and AHE is still going strong. We’ve asked founding member, Kate Jaunay, and current Director, Siobhan Porter, to share some of their stories, and insights they’ve gained from learning together with their family and community.

Panel Discussion – Dads
Popular demand has seen this panel reappear not as a workshop but for the benefit of all attendees.  A panel of experienced home-educating fathers will talk about their participation: cheering from the sidelines to really getting stuck in. If you have questions for the Dads’ Panel please email them to conference@ahe.org.nz

WORKSHOPS


Note: All our speakers are home-educators. The views they hold are their own, and not necessarily representative of AHE. We hope you enjoy the variety of speakers and topics. You may choose one workshop per session.

Workshops
SESSION 1
10.45 am
Mastering Maths
Erin Parkinson
Unschooling for Excellence
Rose Carlyle
Online Learning
Rhys Lewis
& Val Robb
Terrific Teens
Rosie Boom
SESSION 2
12 noon
Stay Sane Home Management
Rachael Ayres
Frances Peeter
Let the Music Speak
Stacey Shuck
Te Tiriti o Waitangi
Natasha Hoffmans
Home-schooling Solo
Rachael Anderson
SESSION 3
3.30 pm
Starting Out
Fiona Taylor
Learning on the Road
Rachael Ayres
Out of the Box
Monica Bayldon
Finishing Well
Natalie Donaldson

CLICK HERE TO READ WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS…

 

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT ABOUT SPEAKERS…

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

Lunch and Morning Tea will be provided. We can accommodate some dietary requirements (GF and vegetarian).

Children
Please make other arrangements for your children as we are unable to provide child-care. Breast/bottle-fed babies are welcome, though we would ask that you are sensitive to others if your baby is getting too noisy ?.

Vendors
A number of vendors selling home-school curriculum and resources will be attending the conference.

PRICING

Because it is AHE’s 20th year to celebrate we are subsidising conference costs. If you are an AHE member, you receive a concession for the conference (and other AHE run events). If you would like to become a member, please click here to join.  (Membership subscription is $20/year or $35 for two years per family).

Early-bird Pricing (register by 20 April)
Individual: $35 ($50 non-member)
Couple: $60 ($85 non-member)

Standard Pricing (registration closes 14 May)
Individual: $45 ($60 non-member)
Couple: $80 ($105 non-member)

Please pay to AHE a/c 12-3011-0543821-04  (Ref ‘name’ and ‘conference’)

Special Concessions
If you are a solo-parent we have a limited number of free tickets to the conference; also if you struggling financially we have concessions available. PLEASE contact Irene (conference@ahe.org.nz) if you are in this situation (or could recommend someone who is).

If you live out of Auckland and accommodation/transport costs plus registration are limiting factors, please also contact Irene.

Please contact us about financial assistance before the end of April.

QUERIES
If you have queries or questions feel free to email Irene at conference@ahe.org.nz.

 

READ FEEDBACK FROM THE 2015 AHE LEARNING TOGETHER CONFERENCE

 

 

REGISTER HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

National Library update

National Library Update

6 March 2017               

Kia ora t?tou

As you know, the National Library of New Zealand released its new strategic directions in early December 2016.

You received a link before Christmas to a short animated video and the document itself, Turning Knowledge into Value: Strategic Directions to 2030.

Te Puna Foundation launch, December 2016: Chris Szekely, Gaynor Brymer, Bill Macnaught, Susie Ferguson, Corin Haines, Peter Murray

As we round out the first quarter of 2017 I would like to provide you with a brief update on our plans for the year.

2017 Strategic Work Programme

This month formally marks the end of the development phase of our strategic work programme and the start of the implementation phase. To support this work I have appointed a strategic lead for each of our three strategic themes, to keep us thinking big and on course to meet our aspirations for 2030. As highly experienced staff from within the Department and the National Library, their names will be familiar to many:

The strategic leads joined my leadership team in a full day workshop last week to refine our priorities and strategic work programme for the year ahead. Significant activities already underway include:

  • Re-launch of Services to Schools online offerings from March, including Any Questions delivered in partnership with the Ministry of Education and libraries;

  • Engagement with authors, publishers, libraries and others in a roundtable discussion in Auckland this week to explore the role that libraries can play in supporting the creative sector, including the future role of the public lending right;

  • Opening of the He Tohu exhibition and associated public programmes in May in our Molesworth Street Wellington building in partnership with Archives New Zealand;

  • Discussions with public libraries to agree a collaborative solution to address the limitations of the current model for public internet services provided through the Aotearoa Peoples Network Kaharoa.

Each of these activities highlights to me the importance of partnerships and collaborative approaches as we start the implementation of our strategic directions.

I will have more to share once our strategic leads are fully up to speed and as our work programme progresses.

Collaboration in-house

To encourage innovation and collaboration on a smaller scale in-house we have recently established the National Library’s own Business Innovation Group. This group of staff meets fortnightly to create, consider and assess proposals that will foster professional development, collaboration and innovation in our daily work.

All this in addition to business as usual at the National Library, so we are looking at a very busy 2017! I look forward to working with you.

Ng? mihi

Bill

Wolsey Hall Oxford

Dear Barbara,

I really like your website and wondered if you would be interested in hearing about Wolsey Hall Oxford.

Wolsey Hall Oxford, established in 1894, is a not-for-profit distance learning course provider. We supply courses for homeschoolers round the world aged 7-18 including Primary, Secondary, IGCSE and A level courses. We have recently been experiencing an increase in students enrolling from New Zealand.

You can find out more about Wolsey Hall Oxford by visiting our website and Wikipedia page as follows:

www.wolseyhalloxford.org.uk

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolsey_Hall,_Oxford

We are particularly proud of the fact Nelson Mandela used Wolsey Hall Oxford to study for his University of London Law degree whilst in Robben Island jail – an inspiration for distance learners everywhere!

If there is any other way you would like us to contribute, please let us know.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Kind regards,

Callum Wilcock

Student Engagement Co-ordinator

Tel: 0800 622 6599  | Skype: callumewilcock | Wolsey Hall Oxford Ltd, Midland House, West Way, Oxford, OX2 0PH|

www.wolseyhalloxford.org.uk | Registered in England No. 6781213

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Head Start Programs Are Setting Children Up for Failure

In recent years, support for preschool education has grown by leaps and bounds. After all, who wouldn’t want to help adorable little kids get an early jump on success?

But the enthusiasm for Pre-K dampened a bit with the release of two studies, one from 2012 which studied children in a Head Start program and another from 2016 which studied children in Tennessee’s statewide preschool program. The Head Start study found that its children were more inclined to behavioral problems than those who did not participate. The Tennessee study, on the other hand, found that participants did worse academically several years into school than those who had not participated.

The news that these Pre-K programs may hurt rather than help was not received favorably by preschool advocates. And according to a recent Brookings Institute article by scholars Dale Farran and Mark Lipsey, Pre-K advocates have done their best to discredit these studies.

But as Farran and Lipsey explain, the attempts to dismiss these findings “are based on incorrect and misleading characterizations of each study.”

 For starters, the Head Start study is dismissed on the grounds that some participants ended up in the wrong study group. But according to Farran and Lipsey, such occurrences happen in many scientific studies, and as such, are controlled for in the final statistics. The authors caution that this does not change the fact that children who participated in the Head Start program exhibited more aggressive behavior, the most concerning factor of the study.

Secondly, Farran and Lipsey explain that the Tennessee study is dismissed on the grounds that it is not a “high-quality” program such as those in major cities like Boston and Tulsa. However, when sample sizes are taken from each of these programs, Farran and Lipsey note that there is no major difference between the academic outcomes of each program. In other words, similarity in outcomes demands that those who dismiss the Tennessee preschool program as being low quality will also have to dismiss the programs they hold up as models.

Read more here: http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/are-pre-k-advocates-overlooking-its-problems

 Is it possible that young children would learn more and have greater long-term success if they weren’t subjected to the classroom at such early ages?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Why Dr. Gordon Neufeld Believes Children Learn More At Home

This TED video is a must for every parent to watch  – I highly recommend it

Learning follows attachment

Why Dr. Gordon Neufeld Believes Children Learn More At Home.
In his recent Rethinking Education TED Talk ‘Relationship Matters’, Dr Gordon Neufeld, Developmental and Clinical Psychologist explores the role close and connected relationships play in our children’s ability to learn.


Neufeld explains that children learn more in the first four years of life informally than in all the rest of their formal education put together! This is because children are naturally curious, exploratory and playful when they are learning within nurturing relationships. Neufeld explains how a child’s emotional well being and their cognitive capacities emerge as a result of their close attachments to us.

Read more here: http://rethinkingparenting.co.uk/dr-gordon-neufeld-believes-children-learn-home-school/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Cost of putting a child through school to year 13 has risen to more than $38,000

From Stuff:

For a child born today, the cost of 13 years of “free” schooling has risen to more than $38,000, up 15 per cent on 10 years ago.

Shoes, stationery, uniform, class trips, textbooks, school donations, bus passes, and laptops – they all mount up as parents prepare to send their children back to school.

Research by ASG Education Programmes shows that, for a child born in 2017, 13 years of school will cost parents $38,362.

Sarah Pope with her sons Nico, 9, and Isaac, 6. She has made saving for their future education a financial priority.

JOHN KIRK-ANDERSON/FAIRFAX NZ

Sarah Pope with her sons Nico, 9, and Isaac, 6. She has made saving for their future education a financial priority.

For parents considering private education, that bill is now $345,996, or 48 per cent more than a decade ago, while integrated schools will cost $109,354 over 13 years.

READ MORE:
Families struggle to afford the rising cost of back-to-school requirements

Schools bring in $11m more in donations during 2015
Kids dip out as cost of school trips rises
School costs pile up for parents
Parents told: Work out how much kids really cost

ASG said the figures are the “average estimated costs and represnt the highest amount parents and families could expect to pay”.

Secondary Principals’ Association Sandy Pasley says schools do what they can to help parents suffering financial stress at the start of the school year.

Porirua mother of four Dinah Ostler-Malaulau said the family was likely to spend hundreds of dollars to get her year 12 daughter Tisa set up for the year. “It’s expensive, really expensive.”

On top of standard stationery requirements, the 16-year-old Tawa College student needed a graphics calculator, and art supplies. Fees for sport and school trips would add to that. The school also asks for a voluntary donation of about $200.

Ostler-Malaulau recently finished working as a teacher at Porirua College, a decile 1 school, where she saw how stressful the start of the school year could be for families.

Education Minister Hekia Parata says spending on education has increased by 35 per cent since 2008-09.

Read the rest of this news article click here: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/88464281/cost-of-putting-a-child-through-school-to-year-13-has-risen-to-more-than-38000

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Golden Bay High School prizegiving: high achieving students honoured

Golden Bay High School's dux Yerren van Sint Annaland

Nina Hindmarsh

Golden Bay High School’s dux Yerren van Sint Annaland

In the news November 8, 2016

This year’s Golden Bay High School’s dux wants to pursue a career in computer programming.

Yerren van Sint Annaland, 17, was recognised as the top scholar at the school’s senior prizegiving on Thursday.

Along with the dux award, van Sint Annaland also won the University of Otago’s Academic Excellence Entrance Scholarship of $45,000.

He was heading to Dunedin next year to start a computer science degree.

The award is given to just a few high school graduates who display not only outstanding academic results but also community service.

Van Sint Annaland said he was chosen for his involvement in a number of different areas including work for the conservation group Project Janszoon. He was on the student advisory board and helped his school adopt a section of the park.

He was also involved with sporting groups representing his school in tennis and football, as well has leading the production and design of his school’s magazine.

He also tutored younger students in maths, English and tennis, as well as helping to make the school magazine and looking after the school’s 3D printer.

Van Sint Annaland said he has kept busy this year with maths, digital technology and physics.

“I managed to complete my level three English last year, and I also did level 3 statistics last year so this year I got to really focus on the stuff that I actually enjoy,” he said.

As part of his digital technology course, van Sint Annaland redesigned Golden Bay’s weather mapping page.

“The old one was was really outdated,” he said. “I had to re-design it more or less from scratch, it was all code and scripting.”

He said home-schooled by his father until Year 9.

“It taught me that you just have to enjoy what you’re doing to learn,” he said.

“When I was home schooled I didn’t do anything except what I wanted to do, so I learned so much about computer programming, which I got into really early on.”

He said he was never taught to read, but just picked it up when he was ready.

“It was the same for maths. It just happened when I was ready.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Science Opportunities

 Nathalie Thomas will be running a few courses in Wellington, Lower Hutt, Palmerston North and Wanganui.

See information below.

Basic chemistry laboratory course (ages 12+) – for waiting list only

This 6-hour lab course covers a large part of the chemistry practical skills usually covered in high school science classes during years 9 and 10. No prior skills or knowledge required.

Content: safety in the lab, the Bunsen burner, separation techniques, chemical reactions,making and testing 3 common gases, pH scale, acids and bases, indicators.

Important: students aged 13 and under need to be accompanied by an adult in the lab, up to 3 students allowed per adult.

Friday 24 February 2017 from 9:30am to 4:30pm with a lunch break from 12:30 to 1:30pm.

Course fee: $45 per student or $120 for 3 siblings. Note: Victoria university is offering their lab, equipment anddemonstrators free of charge making this a very affordable day ?

Venue: Victoria University, Kelburn campus, Wellington.

Radiation and radioactivity (ages 10-14)

During this workshop students will learn about radiation and radioactivity.

There will be a demonstration of the Geiger counter with real radioactivesources. The central theme is space travel and the possibility of colonisation of Mars. A high interest workshop. No prior knowledge or skills required.

Course fee: $20 per student or $50 for 3 siblings.

Dates & venues: Lower Hutt, Mon 27 Feb, 1:15pm to 3:45pm. Russell Keown House.

Palmerston North, Thu 2 March, 10am to 12:30pm, Gateways Church.

Wanganui, Fri 3 Mar, 10:15am to 12:45pm, Training for You campus.

Introduction to Nuclear Physics (ages 13+)

Students will learn about radiation, radioactivity, isotopes and the concept of half-life as well as everydayapplications of nuclear science. We will measure radioactive sources with a Geiger counter. An understanding of atom structure is recommended.

Course fee: $20 per student or $50 for 3 siblings.

Dates & venues: Lower Hutt, Tues 28 Feb, 1:15pm to 3:45pm. Russell Keown House.

Palmerston North, Thu 2 March, 1pm to 3:30pm, Gateways Church.

About the tutor

Nathalie Thomas is a homeschooling mum who lives in the Bay of Plenty. She has a MSc in Chemistry, did her teacher

training in Auckland and taught at high school level for more than 10 years before retiring 11 years ago to become a

home educator. She now runs science workshops and laboratory courses specifically for homeschooled children as well

as online courses. Her website is www.science-for-home-educators.co.nz.

Booking and payment details

To register for the above workshops email Nathalie on info@science-for-home-educators.co.nz , with your name and

contact phone number, your child’s name and age and which workshop(s) you would like to attend.

Payment is due by Wed 15 February 2017. More detailed information about the venue and what to bring will be

provided closer to the time of the workshops.

Note that a refund will only be given if the workshop is cancelled or if there is another family who can take your place.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

Virtual field trip: Victoria University goes to Antarctica

Virtual field trip: Victoria University goes to Antarctica
“It’s not easy to take students to Antarctica, but by filming the lectures on the ice, we can introduce students to this incredible continent.”

Virtual field trip: Victoria University goes to Antarctica

Victoria University is giving students the opportunity to explore Antarctica – for free.

The tertiary education provider is offering its first massive open online course (MOOC) that will allow anyone, anywhere, to explore the ice continent.

Enrolments are now open for Antarctica: From Geology to Human History on the global edX platform, a nonprofit, open-source technology platform founded by United States universities Harvard and MIT, and governed by universities for universities.

With support from Antarctica New Zealand, Dr Cliff Atkins and Dr Rebecca Priestley filmed lectures on location on Ross Island and in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica.

Together, they explore more than 500 million years of geological history and 250 years of geographical discovery and scientific endeavour on the ‘coldest, driest, windiest continent on Earth’.

“It’s not easy to take students to Antarctica, but by filming the lectures on the ice, we can introduce students around the world to this incredible continent,” says Priestley.

Priestley, a science historian and writer who has written extensively about Antarctica, visits Captain Scott’s huts on Ross Island and interviews conservators from the Antarctic Heritage Trust and scientists and logistics staff working at Scott Base and McMurdo Station.

Atkins is an Antarctic veteran, having spent 12 seasons on the ice. He introduces students to some of the planet’s most remarkable landscapes – the Dry Valleys, the Transantarctic Mountains and the world’s southernmost volcanic island.

Antarctica: From Geology to Human History starts on Saturday 15 April. People can enroll now, for free, online here.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Smacking Law Still Rejected, Widely Flouted – Poll

smacking-mai-chen-review-if-i-see-john-keyAlmost a decade on from the passing of the controversial anti-smacking law, a poll has found continued widespread rejection of the law and an admission that 2 out of 3 NZ’ers would flout the law if they believed it reasonable to correct the behaviour of their child.

“Despite having almost 10 years to prove the doubters wrong, the law has failed to convince anybody of its benefits or its effectiveness. In fact, the law has maintained its very high level of opposition, but most significantly, a high level of NZ’ers say they would flout the law despite the possible consequences. This proves the abject failure and rejection by ordinary NZ’ers of this highly controversial and flawed law. If it had any merit, it would have proved itself by now. Instead it has simply threatened and undermined good parents raising great kids,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

smacking-mail-chen-review-if-i-see-mai-chen“It’s time for the politicians to fix this law. One of the most significant things the new Prime Minister of the country Bill English could do is change the approach of his predecessor and respect the views of the NZ public and amend this law.”

In the independent poll of 846 people undertaken by Curia Market Research, only 23% of respondents believe a smack that is reasonable and for the purpose of correction should be a criminal offence – similar to levels in a 2014 poll. 72% disagree with the current law (72% – 2014) and 5% were unsure / refused to say. Opposition to the law was highest in provincial and rural areas, amongst current parents of children under 18, and National and NZ First supporters.

In a further question, 65% of respondents say they would smack their child to correct their behaviour regardless of the anti-smacking law. 28% said they wouldn’t, and 7% were unsure or refused to say. NZ First supporters were most likely to flout the law.

“A report at the beginning of last year analysing the 2007 anti-smacking law, “Defying Human Nature: An Analysis of New Zealand’s 2007 Anti-Smacking Law”, found that there was not a single social indicator relating to the abuse of children that had shown significant or sustained improvement since the passing of the law, and that the law has negatively impacted law-abiding parents.

Police statistics show there has been a 136% increase in physical abuse, 43% increase in sexual abuse, 45% increase in neglect or ill-treatment of children, and 71 child abuse deaths since the law was passed in 2007. CYF have had more than 1 million notifications of abuse and there has been a 42% increase in physical abuse found by CYF since 2007. And health data reveals a 132% increase in children diagnosed with emotional and/or behavioural problems and a 71% increase in children hospitalised with mental and behavioural disorders since 2007.

An analysis of the law in 2014 by Public Law Specialists Chen Palmer said that statements made by politicians to the effect that the new section 59 does not criminalise “good parents” for lightly smacking their children appear to be inconsistent with the legal effect of section 59 and the cases they analysed.

“New Zealanders predicted all of this before the law was passed, but their concerns were ignored. The politicians and anti-smacking lobby groups linked good parents who smacked their children with child abusers, a notion roundly rejected – and still rejected – by NZ’ers. The anti-smacking law assumes that previous generations disciplined their children in a manner that was so harmful that they should now be considered criminals,” says Mr McCoskrie.

Family First NZ continues to call for the government to adopt the ‘Borrows amendment’ which allows non-abusive smacking and which the National party had previously lobbied and voted for.

The nationwide poll was carried out during November and has a margin of error of +/- 3.4%.

READ THE FULL POLL RESULTS

– See more at: http://bobmccoskrie.com/?p=18327#sthash.XxnQIr9M.liOrdtH3.dpuf

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Tauranga film to debut with Lion King

“Home Educated sisters have written, produced, filmed, directed and edited this movie. If you’re in the BOP pop on down tonight and check it out.”
Cast and Crew from Tauranga short film Implications of Imagination, which will debut at Mount Drury's Lion King screening tomorrow night. Photo/supplied
Cast and Crew from Tauranga short film Implications of Imagination, which will debut at Mount Drury’s Lion King screening tomorrow night. Photo/supplied

People gathering at Mount Drury tomorrow for a Night Owl Cinema screening of The Lion King will be treated to the debut of a short film created by a Tauranga 16-year-old.

Implications of Imagination is the directional debut short film from teen photographer and film maker Rose McMahon. Rose is the founder of photography business Little Miss Rose.

The film features NZ’s Got Talent finalist Fletcher Oxford as one of the main stars and explores the relationship between Oliver, a teenage boy, and his much younger sister Maggie (played by Daria Galey) and possibly one or two fairies.

The film will be screen at Mount Drury from 8pm tomorrow night.

Cast and Crew from Tauranga short film Implications of Imagination, which will debut at Mount Drury's Lion King screening tomorrow night. Photo/supplied
Cast and Crew from Tauranga short film Implications of Imagination, which will debut at Mount Drury’s Lion King screening tomorrow night. Photo/supplied

Rose said the goal of the film was to encourage people of all ages to dream a little. To let themselves imagine what might be possible and believe in themselves.

The movie was filmed in one day on an almost zero budget with a cast and crew of volunteers.

”Seeing the film on the big screen in front of a big crowd will make all the hard work and effort worthwhile. And [it] will be a thrill for all the cast and crew,” Rose said.

The crew involved included scriptwriters, camera operators, sound technicians, drone operators, film production people, hair and makeup artists and casting agents.

Rose said the film showcased ”just how talented people in the film community in the Bay of Plenty is, with so many incredible and capable people”.

Fletcher will also perform a song he has written, inspired by the movie. Other performers include Seth Rackman and the Hitmen Fuse Bucket Drummers.

Street Food Union food trucks will also be available.

The movie is awaiting classification but is expected to be family friendly.

The event is open to the public from 6pm and a gold coin donation to attend. The movie is expected to screen at 8pm.

– Bay of Plenty Times

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading