February 14, 2016

Latest posts from Home Education Foundation

Young baker gets his diploma at 16

From the Rotorua Daily Post: Http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rotorua-daily-post/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503438&objectid=11588064

A local teen with a knack for rising early has finished his diploma in baking, at just 16. Haans Paraki-Webber, a home-school student, started doing work experience at Rotorua’s Ciabatta Bakery when he was just 13.

After a year of unpaid work experience, bakery owners Alex and Sue Burge were so impressed with Haans’ commitment, they offered him paid employment one day a week. Since then he has completed his diploma in baking through Waiariki Institute of Technology.

Haans said his year at Waiariki was “fantastic” and that he was relieved to finish.

“It was really fun, some parts were hard, but mostly fun. I’m relieved to be finished but I’m also a little bit sad that I don’t get to hang out with my classmates any more.”

He said the most challenging part for him was the assignments, adding he was good at the practical side of things though and managed to get through quite well.

Haans said it was his goal to one day open his own bakery but for now he was enjoying working fulltime at Ciabatta Bakery.

“I work four days a week, it’s nice to have a three-day weekend as well as doing what I love when I go to work,” Haans said.

He said Mr Burge had been really helpful and he was always learning from him.

Haans first acquired his passion for baking when he was 12 and started making packet mix cakes from the supermarket.

“Then I learned how to make them from scratch and a friend of mine took me to one of his shifts at the bakery and that’s when I wanted to be a baker. It was awesome seeing how it was made in bulk.”

He said if there was anyone else out there wanting to do something similar at a young age they should work hard to get it. “Even if you don’t really want to do something that will get you there, put effort into it and make it fantastic. Try to enjoy everything you do.”

Haans’ mum Cindy Paraki said the point of difference with Haans was that he was so young when he knew what he wanted to do.

She said it was hard to get people to take him seriously and she was grateful to the Burges and Waiariki for doing so.

“They haven’t taken on someone as young as him before but he did really well. He was so lucky with his training and now he is in a position where he is training others coming through.”

Ms Paraki said she would love to see other businesses take youngsters under their wing because it had taught Haans so much.

“He was so confident picking knifes and chopping and mixing things. He got into it seriously from the age of 12 when he just kept making things. He has the confidence to try anything,” Ms Paraki said.

Mr Burge said Haans was such a young enthusiastic guy.

“We realised he had potential to do really well and after all this time he has done exceptionally well.”

Mr Burge said it was great to see how Haans had progressed from being a young apprentice to training the new staff they had recently employed. “He has such an awesome attitude that makes the workplace environment just fantastic.”

Rotorua Daily Post

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Marlborough parents feel home schooling suits their children

Marlborough mother says she has nothing against traditional schooling, but at home her children are free to learn “what they want, when they want”.

Niki Boon said her children learned primarily through books and observing the world, and her son Kurt would decide whether he wanted to go to high school.

Boon had home schooled all four of her children, aged between 6 and 12-years-old.

Boon and husband Rob Simcic decided home schooling suited their children better, she said.

“We just preferred our kids at home.”

READ MORE:
Home schooling: weird or wonderful?
School’s out, this time forever
‘The children decide what to learn’

They had a lot of freedom in how they structured their children’s day, Boon said.

“They have to learn ‘as much and as often’ as they would at school, but it’s really vague.”

The number of home schooled children in Marlborough climbed to 62 last year.

Fifty children were educated at home in 2014, although in previous years the numbers had reached 100.

The number of children enrolled in schools in Marlborough last year was more than 6600.

Boon knew of some home schooling parents who kept to a rigid timetable, but she did not dictate what her children had to learn and when.

The children had plenty of opportunities to socialise, sometimes with workers from all over the world who stayed on their Spring Creek property, Boon said.

To home school their children, parents had to apply for a certificate of exemption from the Ministry of Education.

Parents had to provide information to the ministry including a statement of their philosophy, what subjects they intended to teach, and a description of intended environmental, social and community contact.

Children who were home schooled could take NCEA exams through the Correspondence School or through a “link school”.

Twice a year parents had to make a declaration to the Ministry of Education that the home schooling was continuing. Students were allowed to “trial” a school for up to 10 weeks, without losing their home schooling status.

Fellow home schooling mother Veronika Merkle, originally from Germany, made the decision to home school her son Corbinian, 6, because she wanted him to grow up bilingual.

She also felt he was too young to be separated from the family.

While she hoped to home school him all the way through primary school, she would have to wait and see whether it suited him, she said.

“As they grow up they might have different needs, that we might struggle to meet,” she said.

Marlborough Boys’ College principal Wayne Hegarty said occasionally students who were home schooled would come to Marlborough Boys’ to do their NCEA exams.

“Some will do very well. It just varies, really.”

Two years ago, William Irwin-Harris, who was home schooled for most of his life, became proxime accessit to the dux.

“He was a very bright boy, and it was nice to see him grow in confidence,” Hegarty said.

William’s mother Jacqui Harris said he had just won a prize for mathematics at Victoria University.

Parent Smyth Brydon said her son attended Grovetown School, but her 8-year-old daughter Brooke was educated at home. She tried school for two years but decided she wanted to try learning at home.

“She’s a real free spirit, and I’m a real fan of following the children’s lead,” Brydon said.

“She [experienced school], and it was good, but at the end of the day she said ‘no, I still want to give this a go’,” Brydon said.

Brooke’s preschool teacher first suggested home schooling after Brydon said she was concerned Brooke was not ready for school. Initially Brydon was reluctant, but after she did some research into it she thought it would suit the family.

Brydon said she hoped Brooke would choose to keep learning at home, as she did not want her to feel the pressure to fit in as she got older.

Brooke was very self-motivated, Brydon said.

“If she wants to become a doctor, she’ll become a doctor. If she wants to become an artist, she’ll become an artist.”

Each year about 5500 New Zealand children were home schooled.

 - The Marlborough Express

Read more here and see photo:  http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/76571741/marlborough-parents-feel-home-schooling-suits-their-children.html

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Homeschooling children in Victoria on the rise

PARENTS are increasingly turning their backs on traditional schooling and tutoring their children at home.

On the cusp of the new school year, the profile of homeschooling has been given a boost after a VCE student earned top marks for 2015 after a mix of home and distance education.

Figures show 4136 students were educated at home in Victoria last year, or 0.44 per cent of children, up from 3233 in 2012.

Bullying at school, disabilities, medical conditions and lifestyle choices are among the main reasons parents decide to teach their kids at home.

The story of Stephen Zhang, 17, who achieved the maximum 99.95 ATAR after being taught by his mum until year 10, has shone a spotlight on homeschooling.

Read the rest of the article here: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/homeschooling-children-in-victoria-on-the-rise/news-story/57bf6b9ec6c92a65b4c8bca2feb09007#load-story-comments

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

The Seduction of Homeschooling Families: Government Homeschooling Programs Seek to Eliminate Parents’ Choices for Their Children’s Education

Something to watch out for in New Zealand and Australia in the future:

Do the public school authorities feel threatened by homeschooling? Judging by their efforts to lure homeschooling families into dependence on local school districts, the answer is apparently yes.

For the last several years, homeschooling has been the fastest growing educational alternative in the country. Estimates of its growth rate typically range from 15 to 25 percent annually. Homeschoolers are notoriously difficult to count; however, the National Homeschooling Research Institute believes that currently 1.2 million children get their education at home. While that constitutes only about 2 percent of all school-age children, it’s more than 20 percent of those who are outside the government educational system. and, with a 20 percent annual growth rate, another quarter million children will join the homeschooling movement this year.

The sheer number of homeschoolers represents a distinct threat to the hegemony of the government school monopoly. Qualitatively, the academic success of homeschoolers, measured by standardized test scores and recruitment by colleges, debunks the myth that parents need to hire credentialed experts to force children to learn.

Homeschooling also refutes the “more money equals better education” mantra of the teachers unions. The average homeschooling family spends approximately 10 percent of the per-pupil costs associated with government schools in achieving those academic results.2 Multiplied by the number of homeschoolers, even these modest amounts add up to a sizeable market attracting numerous educational entrepreneurs.

Besides challenging the legitimacy of government schools, homeschoolers also pose a more direct economic threat. Funding for government schools is based on attendance, with a national average of almost $6,000 per student.3 Homeschooled children represent over $7 billion out of reach of local government schools, and, at its current growth rate, each year over $1 billion more slips away.

Politically, homeschoolers are a force to be reckoned with when their rights are endangered. The most highly publicized and effective example of their growing political clout occurred in 1994, when the House of Representatives inserted language into an educational appropriations bill that would have required all teachers to be credentialed. Homeschoolers perceived that provision as a threat to their autonomy and overwhelmed phone and fax lines to their representatives until the credentialing language was removed by a 424-1 vote.

Homeschooling’s economic and political impact is keenly felt by teachers unions, educational bureaucrats, ideological indoctrinators, and other beneficiaries of today’s system. What will happen when the growing number of homeschooling families withdraw their political support for the enormous taxes required to fund today’s $300 billion government system?

To combat those threats, defenders of the status quo are fighting back with all the legal, legislative, and economic weapons at their disposal. The most insidious of these tactics is the systematic undermining and co-opting of the homeschooling movement by establishing government homeschooling programs. Those programs set seductive lures before families by providing “free” resources, teachers, extracurricular activities, facilities, and even cash reimbursement.

When enough families have voluntarily returned to the government system, it will be a relatively straightforward matter to recapture the rest by imposing mandatory homeschooling oversight regulations. Will this seduction succeed in eliminating independent homeschoolers and derailing the growing free market in education? Economics and the history of private schools versus government schools provide ample lessons on what to expect.

The Birth of a Free Market in Education

The term “homeschooling” is a bit of a misnomer. To many people the word conjures up a vision of mom instructing her kids around the kitchen table–a myth perpetuated by the media, which invariably demand that particular image to illustrate their stories. The reality is far different. While instruction around the kitchen table does indeed occur in most homeschooling families, the flexibility and range of homeschooling encourages an enormous variety of alternative educational models. Those models range from child-led, interest-based learning (unschooling) to the traditional classroom model with professional teachers. They include distance learning, cooperative teaching arrangements between parents, commercial learning centers, and subject-specific tutors. Many young teenagers routinely take junior college or university courses. Others participate in the revival of apprenticing.

The homeschooling boom has not gone unnoticed by educational entrepreneurs. Homeschooling conferences attract huge numbers of vendors catering to the hundreds (and in some cases, thousands) of families attending. Traditional curriculum vendors have repackaged their wares specifically for the homeschooling market. Homeschooling magazines and newsletters flourish, increasing in number. Organizations providing paid support (curriculum counseling, bureaucratic paperwork assistance, legal support) for homeschooling families continue to spring up.

Supplementing these numerous commercial ventures and, in most cases, preceding them, are a multitude of local support groups that arose spontaneously to help meet the needs of new and existing homeschooling families. Much of the power of the homeschooling movement comes from these groups, through which families gather to meet the social and academic needs of their children. Those voluntary groups create the environment for low-cost or no-cost academic solutions, such as:

  • cooperative teaching, which leverages the existing talents and interests of parents;
  • information sharing among parents about what works and what doesn’t for different learning styles;
  • renting community rooms (or homes) for group activities and classes;
  • hiring professional teachers by the hour (for example, our science teacher is paid $75 an hour, which breaks down to $5 a child); and
  • field trips for hands-on learning.

Homeschooling support groups also provide all of the social activities found in traditional schools. One group, All Ways Learning in San Jose, is typical of the depth of activities provided by voluntary support groups once a critical mass of families is involved. The group meets twice weekly, once at a local park and once in a rented community room. Volunteer families organize the monthly newsletter, yearbook, yearly “school” pictures, monthly “PTA” meetings (aka “Parents’ Night Out”), holiday parties, dances, and choir. In addition, a homeschooling sports league in the area sponsors baseball, basketball, and soccer for several hundred homeschooled children. Homeschooling, with its varied commercial and volunteer ventures, is a microcosm of what a true free market in education could look like–parents and children working together, mixing and matching, tailoring the educational style to what works best for them; families spending their educational dollars as they choose, with educational entrepreneurs creating a wide-ranging marketplace of goods and services. It’s not just mom and the kids around the kitchen table. It’s a new educational model.

Be sure to read the rest of the article here:

https://fee.org/freeman/the-seduction-of-homeschooling-families/

 

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

 

Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway

Picture

This is a reminder that the Getaway is in the not too distant future so now is the time to be booking it in on your calendar and booking your space at camp.  Remember, you can camp for extra days if you want to.  Some of our regular families spend a few extra days in camp enjoying an extended holiday time.

We had our biggest camp so far last Feb, so past the word around, share the love, and invite some more to join us in Feb 2016.  Below is the brochure with all the details on it.

The Drinnan Clan

Taupo

what’s happening …

The annual Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway is for Christian homeschooling families to connect with other families for mutual encouragement and friendship. It aims to be …

like-minded

There’s nothing more encouraging than knowing we are not alone in this awesome task of discipling our children at home. Meeting with others who are going through the same triumphs and struggles can lift a tired soul! And how important it is, for our children to have like-minded friends.

family-centred

This is a getaway for the whole family. Enjoy a weekend away or extend your time at the campsite and have a family holiday as well. This is not a camp/conference in the traditional sense, it is families relaxing together.

budget-conscious

Raising a family on a single income is no easy task but God is faithful. So being mindful of this, we have chosen to go to a conventional campsite. There are limited cabins available also. We will let you organise your own family’s food which is much cheaper than paying someone else to cook it and you can meet your own budget requirements.

fun-filled

We have a programme of fun games and activities for the young and not so young, and of course, we are camped right on the shores of beautiful Lake Taupo for swimming, boating, etc! We have a hall on site for fellowship, Sunday morning devotional, or in case it rains.

Friday

7:00 pm Meet in function room, introduce each family

8:00 pm Supper

Saturday

9:30 am Games for all who choose to participate

10:30 am Morning Tea

11:15 pm More Games

12:30 pm Lunch Break

1:30 pm Free time for swimming, fellowshipping, sightseeing, etc

6:00 pm Shared BBQ dinner by function room

7:00 pm Free time/board games in function room/swimming

Sunday

Please pack up your cabin by 10am

10.00 am Devotional Hour – some singing and some sharing

11:30 am Final pack up of tents etc and last swim at lake

any questions?

Murray & Sharon Drinnan  evergreen@farmside.co.nz

I am a companion of all who fear You, and of those who keep Your precepts – Psalm 119:63

TO REGISTER

To book your camping requirements:

Go to www.motuterebay.co.nz

  •  Choose your preferred camping choice.

    Arrival time – 2:00pm onwards Friday, 12 Feb 2016.Departure time – 11:30am Sunday, 14 Feb 2016

  • Book directly with the camp for the weekend of 12-14 Feb 2016. Mention that you are with the Christian Homeschoolers Family Sumer Getaway.
  • You are responsible for your deposit payment, and on arriving at camp, all outstanding payments.
  • Tent sites are priced $18.00 per person over 14yrs. Children 5-14yrs $9.00. Under 5yrs $5.00. A limited number of cabins and flats are available. Prices are subject to change, please see website.
  • Day visitors are welcome for Saturday. Cost: half price of tent site prices. Book directly with the camp. Mention that you are with the Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway. Please park in the visitors carpark and you are required to depart by 9:00pm.
  • Please note that the showers and laundry facilities are coin operated. If you have any queries about the camp facilities, please ask them directly.
  • Check out the website, it is a beautiful place to camp!

To register for the Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway:

  • Send an email stating your intention to attend either the whole weekend or as day visitors on Saturday, and the number of adults and children, with their ages, to: evergreen@farmside.co.nz
  • To cover the cost of hall hireage and games, pay $20 per family in cash at Getaway to Murray or Sharon
  • You are responsible for preparing and bringing your own food, cutlery, plates, washing up, etc, for all your meals. The camp has very good kitchen facilities. For the Saturday night shared BBQ, bring your own meat and drinks for your family, and two plates of food (salads, potato dishes, for example) to share. We will provide a gas BBQ to cook the meat on.
  • Please do not bring any alcohol to the Getaway.
  • You are responsible for the supervision, care, and behaviour of your own children.
  • You are responsible for all your camping needs e.g. tents, bedding, etc. 12 – 14 FEB 2016

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

Need help on global homeschool research

Dear Parent (or someday parent),

We invite and encourage you to participate in some very important research related to homeschooling (or home education).

The purpose of this international research initiative is to identify, understand, and compare barriers that parents face in choosing to home educate their children.

Results of this study will be used to help equip parents to make more informed decisions in the education of their children, and to propose solutions for removing barriers to homeschooling.

Get started now. [ link http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2511422/1971b3fae031]. Click on the green arrow in the bottom right corner

Dr. Brian D. Ray is internationally known for his research on homeschooling. He is trusted by the global homeschool community and he is the investigator for this project.

All data will be confidentially analyzed. All results will be presented in an anonymous way. You will receive a free summary of the research results if you want one.

We urge you to help us with this internationally important project. Start here (Click on the green arrow in the bottom right corner. )

Sincerely,

Barbara Smith

Home Education Foundation

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

 

Help for Single Home Educating Mums in NZ

A message from Lisa:

Hi everyone!

I have just started a new facebook group, called Blessings for Single Parent Homeschoolers NZ.

The idea behind the group is to have a place where we can gift useful, beautiful things to single parent homeschoolers. If you have curriuculum, clothing, household items, etc, you may offer them for free, to bless others.

Please join if you are a single parent homeschooler and would love some love and support, or if you are in a position to gift things to others!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1670534149897879/

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Please share/forward this link with other home educators.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

 

Homeschooling 2015 Statistics

Homeschooling

As at 1 July 2015, there were 5,558 home schooled students recorded in the Ministry of Education’s Homeschooling database. These students belong to 2,916 families and represent 0.7% of total school enrolments as at 1 July 2015. Out of the 5,558 homeschoolers 66.5% were the aged 12 or under, 66.6% had been home-schooled for less than 5 years, and only 4.4% had been home-schooled for 10 years or more.

Homeschooling Students Time Series Downloads: File Type & Size

Homeschooling Turnover

Between 1 July 2014 and 1 July 2015 there was an overall net increase of 3 students; 1,032 students entered into homeschooling and 1,029 students finished homeschooling.

The average age of the 1,032 students entering into homeschooling was 8 years old…

To read  more and to see more graphs please go to the MoE website:  https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/statistics/schooling/student-numbers/homeschooling

It has always been a concern for Craig and myself that the turnover of home educators each year has been so high and this year is no different with 1032 students commencing and 1029 students finishing. There are a lot of people willing to help others on the home education road who might be overwhelmed, needing help or encouragement. All around New Zealand there are support groups as well as Facebook and the Yahoo groups which are a great place to get your questions answered, to get encouragement etc.

Edited to add: Students Finishing Homeschooling by Duration & Region 2015 Click on link to see the full graph

Number of students finishing homeschooling by Duration & Regional Council (Year ending 1 July 2015)

Regional Council Number of Years Student has been in Homeschooling
Less than one year 1 Year 2 Years 3 Years 4 Years 5 Years 6 Years 7 Years 8 Years 9 Years 10 Years 11 Years 12 Years 13 Years or more
Northland Region 20 9 2 6 4 1 3 5 3 12 2 5 1
Auckland Region 65 39 34 17 20 10 10 8 15 25 7 10 8 1
Waikato Region 37 23 17 7 10 3 8 4 4 16 9 9 3
Bay of Plenty Region 27 10 4 5 9 5 4 2 4 14 4 4 1
Gisborne Region 2 1 1 1 1
Hawkes Bay Region 4 2 1 2 2 3 1 1 2 2
Taranaki Region 4 4 2 1 1 5 2 1 4 1
Manawatu-Wanganui Region 7 7 8 2 4 2 5 2 2 10 4 4 1
Wellington Region 10 12 5 7 8 6 3 3 2 6 4 7 1
Tasman Region 12 4 5 1 1 1 1 3 1
Nelson Region 3 4 2 3 3 1 4 1 2 2
Marlborough Region 1 2 1 1 1
West Coast Region 3 2 1 3 1
Canterbury Region 12 11 12 9 15 8 6 7 5 16 11 7 4
Otago Region 8 2 5 1 1 2 2 1 3 5 1
Southland Region 3 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 2
Unknown 7 2 1 2 3 1 1 2
Total 222 134 102 59 80 45 48 40 46 124 47 56 25 1

Less than 1 year: 222
I year:                    134
2 years:                  102
3 years:                    59
4 years:                    80
5 years:                    45
6 years:                    48
7 years:                    40
8 years:                    46
9 years:                  124
10 years:                  47
11 years:                   56
12 years:                  25
13 years:                     1

.

NZ Home Education Support Groups

NZ-r-Online Encouragement for Home Educators

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Please share/forward this link with other home educators.

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

HOMESCHOOL BOY IN GOVERNMENT CUSTODY 7 YEARS: Parents fight officials in ‘last hope’ to see own son

Update 30 November from Ruby and Christer:

From  Ruby Harrold-Claesson:

We have already sent three (3) applications/complaints to the European Court of Human Rights:
1 – the violation of their freedom of movement and violation of their right to private and family life;
2 – the violation of their right to a fair trial, i e the right to choose their own lawyer and
3 – the transfer of guardianship, i e the violation of their right to private and family life.
All have been declared inadmissible.

 From Christer:

On top of the Swedish page about human rights I read the following,

Human rights are universal and apply to everyone. They state that all people, regardless of country, culture and context, are born free and equal in dignity and rights.

- – - – - – wow, sounds good doesn’t it.

We have no funds to work with anymore, so there is little we can do from here. I kept the pressure for a year on 750UDS per month, went below 120 pounds because of that. So it’s fight or eat.

They know exactly what they are doing, this is what they want, and they smile about it for sure…

Have tried pretty much everything when it comes to fighting and getting a job etc. So the question is what to do from here. Fight and die, or just live.

The actual image of Sweden should be clear now though. The country in it self, the nature and all animals is beauty, but that’s about it.

Have no clue what to do from here, neither do we have any tools to work with.

http://www.manskligarattigheter.se/en

 

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When Domenic Johansson was seven years old, he and his parents, Christer and Annie, were moving from their home in Sweden to his mother’s native India. They actually were seated aboard the jet waiting to take off.

Then Swedish police, dispatched by social workers infuriated over the family’s homeschooling, boarded the airliner, took Domenic by force and put him in the custody of the nation’s social services agency.

He’s been there since.

And he hasn’t even seen his parents since 2010, after social workers torpedoed what had been sporadic and supervised times together.

Now that nation’s Supreme Court is being asked to review what has been described as a “vicious” attack on the family, and supporters of the Johanssons say the rest of the world can chime in.

Officials with the Home School Legal Defense Association have confirmed that a lawyer working with the Johanssons is filing an appeal with the Swedish Supreme Court, aided by both the HSLDA and the international Alliance Defending Freedom.

They say those who are interested in justice in the case can contribute by sending a message to the court regarding case O-4373-15 with the request that the judges grant the family’s appeal.

Contact information for the court and other details have been posted online by the HSLDA.

The organization suggests that people point out to the court that “The United Nations Declaration on Human Rights recognizes the family as the fundamental group unit of society and entitled to protection of (and from) the state.”

“Now we are asking for your help in what may be their last hope and appeal to ever be reunited with their son,” HSLDA said in a new report on the situation.

See what American education has become, in “Crimes of the Educators: How Utopians Are Using Government Schools to Destroy America’s Children.”

HSLDA outlined the history of the case: Social workers enraged by homeschooling, which was legal in Sweden at the time, used police to abduct the little boy, and then added claims of issues with his vaccinations and teeth to the complaint. Then social workers, aided by the local courts, simply kept Domenic.

“Imagine – living just miles from your child but being prevented by government authorities from seeing him at all – for years,” HSLDA said. “This is the tragic story of the Johansson family, who were homeschooling in Sweden when they decided to move to India, Annie Johansson’s home country. The three of them were seated on a jetliner in June 2009 when, moments before takeoff, police and social workers boarded the plane and seized Domenic.”

The HSLDA said the initial explanation was the family’s homeschooling.

“Later they [officials] said the parents had neglected Domenic by failing to keep his vaccinations up to date and to have cavities in his teeth,” HSLDA said.

After years of court fights, in December 2012, the courts transferred the custody rights for Domenic to the state, and the European Court of Human Rights has rejected appeals submitted to its officials.

Domenic’s parents now have left the “tenuous thread of hope” with a petition filed by Ruby Harrold-Claesson, a human rights attorney and chief of the Nordic Committee for Human Rights.

Her appeal is to the Swedish Supreme Court.

“This is a tragic case. Unfortunately, it’s not the only one I’ve dealt with in Sweden, but it is very tragic,” she told HSLDA. “Our previous victory in a lower court was so diametrically opposed to the appeals court’s ruling that this appeal should be heard. The Swedish court culture is vicious to families who are caught in it. I’m doing all I can for this family, but it is very difficult.”

“The Johansson case represents every parent’s worst nightmare,” said Mike Donnelly, the head of HSLDA’s global outreach. “Domenic should have been returned to his parents years ago, but the Swedish social services machine is pitiless and unrelenting. I can’t even imagine the pain and suffering this family has endured. HSLDA and our allies at ADF are committed to helping this family, but the outcome is doubtful absent a miracle.

Domenic and Annie Johansson

Domenic and Annie Johansson

“Even if we win, the damage done to this family by the Swedish state is unimaginable. We need our friends to pray and show solidarity with the Johanssons as we try to get the attention of the Swedish court,” he said.

A recent ruling from the international human rights body said, “The applicants had failed in their care of [Domenic], both physical and psychological.”

It claimed Domenic “had not been allowed to go to school” and was “isolated.”

But WND reported legal experts argue Swedish officials violated multiple human rights enshrined in international treaties to which the Swedish government is a party: the right of parents to direct the education of their children, family life, due process, travel and more.

“The seizure of the child without a valid court order, from a plane he was lawfully entitled to be on, the detention by the state in foster care with virtually zero contact with his family and finally the termination of parental rights is a clear violation of international human rights standards,” HSLDA founder and Chairman Michael Farris, who holds a master of law degree in public international law from the University of London, said earlier.

Swedish officials several times have declined to respond to WND questions.

When the family tried to leave Sweden in 2009 for India, the mother’s homeland, armed police stormed the plane and abducted young Domenic without a warrant or court order.

Numerous experts and attorneys have described the incident as a brazen example of “state-napping.”

When one court decision was released in Sweden in favor of the parents, government officials simply kept Domenic in custody until they were able to get it reversed.

Legal experts from around the world have told WND that the pretexts cited to seize Domenic do not stand up to scrutiny, especially because homeschooling was legal in Sweden at the time, and the right to homeschool is guaranteed under multiple human rights treaties.

“No legitimate justification has ever been produced to defend the seizure or the ongoing custody of the boy,” HSLDA said.

As WND has been reporting for years, the Johansson family is hardly alone in battling Swedish authorities for the right to homeschool.

Dozens of families have already fled abroad, including Jonas Himmelstrand, the chief of the Swedish Homeschooling Association, ROHUS, who fled to Finland with his wife and children.

See what American education has become, in “Crimes of the Educators: How Utopians Are Using Government Schools to Destroy America’s Children.”


Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2015/11/homeschool-boy-in-govt-custody-for-7-years/#rPJRePLfod9Ef4Au.99

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Please share/forward this link with other home educators.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

 

NZ Home Schooler wins the World Education a Games

Twizel pupil Joshua Toon, 8, beats 6 million kids to win World Education Games

Twizel 8-year-old Joshua Toon describes his victory at the World Education Games.

Twizel whizkid Joshua Toon can make a claim to being the smartest 8-year-old in the world.

Joshua has just returned from an awards ceremony in Sydney after he swept aside more than 6 million children from 159 countries to take out first overall for Year 3s in the 2015 World Education Games.

His total points score of 4,727 across three categories – science, literacy and maths – was a whopping 344 points higher than that of his nearest competitor, a boy from Australia.

Twizel's Joshua Toon, 8, was the top year 3 pupil in the world in the World Education Games.

CHRIS HYDE/FAIRFAX NZ

Twizel’s Joshua Toon, 8, was the top year 3 pupil in the world in the World Education Games. 

As well as winning the overall award, Joshua took out first in science by three points with a score of 347, and his score of 1,578 in maths was good enough for a bronze medal behind boys from Nigeria and Pakistan.

“I was like, wow, I really did it. I tried and I got it,” Joshua said. “I was feeling really happy then, especially when I found out I was going to Australia for a trip.”

The World Education Games, created by Australian-based company 3PL Learning, involved an online speed and knowledge test, which ran over three days in October.

Joshua, who is home-schooled, has the perfect skill set for it.

Firstly, the car-loving youngster has a near-photographic memory. When he goes on a long drive, just about every number plate he sees is matched to the make and model of the car and stored for future use.

Secondly, and almost as importantly, he’s “extremely fast” at typing.

The maths section of the games is a sprint race, and Joshua answered an average of about 100 questions a minute. Science is less of a sprint, with more points given for answering difficult questions.

“I think science is probably my favourite of the categories because it has history in it too,” Joshua said. “It asks things like when did Thomas Edison invent the lightbulb and I like those sort of questions.”

As a 6-year-old, in 2013, Joshua placed second in maths and third in science in New Zealand in the 4 to 7 years category of the games, but said this was a far better feeling.

“I was actually able to smile for photos this time. Last time, my two front teeth had just come out so I couldn’t do it without feeling embarrassed.”

For his efforts Joshua had won a new generation Microsoft Surface Pro laptop, worth about $1,500, and had made his parents, Kalyani and Trevor Toon, “very proud”.

“He would never have done it without a bit of a mother’s push,” his mum said with a laugh.

“He has the talent of being able to think very fast on his feet and it’s great that he’s using that. I want him to keep going but also to keep staying humble.”

Joshua might face some family competition in coming years, with younger sister Kayla also expressing an interest in taking part in the games, Kalyani said.

From and also watch video:  http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/74409035/twizel-pupil-joshua-toon-8-beats-6-million-kids-to-win-world-education-games.html

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Please share/forward this link with other home educators.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

Services to Schools changes for home educators-National Library

Email from the National Library

I’m Kia ora

The National Library is currently updating all users about our new services, and in particular, our lending service changes for next year.  We want to make sure that all the home educators around the country know what is changing and how to get in touch with us if they have any questions.  We would very much appreciate it if you could please forward this to your members.

How to borrow resources from the National Library’s Services to Schools in 2016

This email is to update you on changes to National Library’s Services to Schools. From January next year the way you can borrow resources from the National Library is changing.

The aim is to provide you, as a home educator, with high interest print resources that support the development of inquiry skills (Inquiry Loans) and reading for pleasure (Reading Engagement Loans).

Features:

  • You can request a loan four times a year of fiction and nonfiction print resources to ignite inquiry learning and to stimulate reading engagement.
  • Your loans will include up to 8 inquiry items, up to 8 reading engagement items and the option to request up to 4 author/titles based upon your own author/title search of the Schools Collection catalogue or the National Library General Collection catalogue (maximum of up to 20 items per family per term).

Next steps

You will be contacted in January 2016 about how to register and order books online.

Other changes

In addition to the lending service, National Library is also developing and revamping the other services provided to New Zealand schools. These are:

•             Digital content service

The National Library is currently creating a digital content service that will make it easy for teachers and students to find useful and relevant digital content for a wide variety of learning contexts. This service will be introduced progressively during 2016.

•             Capability building service

This service includes professional learning and development opportunities, targeted initiatives, learning events and professional learning resources. The National Library will be continuing with its facilitated online courses during 2016 and its other capability building opportunities will be introduced progressively during the year.

If you would like more information on the services that National Library’s Services to Schools will be delivering next year then please visit www.schools.natlib.govt.nz/about/service-changes-2016  or email them on: s2stransformation@dia.govt.nz.

Kind regards

Services to Schools Transformation

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Please share/forward this link with other home educators.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

The New Exemption Form for Home Schooling

The MoE have put the new Home Education Exemption Form up on their website:
New Home Education Exemption Form and new guidance documents
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Please share/forward this link with other home educators.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Needing help for your home schooling journey:http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/