December 10, 2018

Children should learn mainly through play until age of eight, says Lego

Toy company funds research suggesting educational development can be hindered by early formal schooling. So are UK schools getting it wrong?

A child plays in a nursery.
The Lego Foundation has put £4m into a play professorship at Cambridge University. The first incumbent will be chosen in April Photograph: Gary Calton for the Observer

Parents are squeezing the role of play out of their children’s lives in favour of the three ‘R’s as they try to prepare their offspring for a competitive world, according to the head of Lego’s education charity arm.

A lack of understanding of the value of play is prompting parents and schools alike to reduce it as a priority, says Hanne Rasmussen, head of the Lego Foundation. If parents and governments push children towards numeracy and literacy earlier and earlier, it means they miss out on the early play-based learning that helps to develop creativity, problem-solving and empathy, she says.

According to Rasmussen, the evidence for play-based learning has built enormously over the last decade, but parents don’t know about it. “Both in the formal education system and in the homes of children, the focus on the value of play is rather limited. That’s really something we want to work on – to improve the understanding of the value of play and what play really can do, where more and more it is squeezed by a desire both from the formal system and from parents that children should learn specific literacy and numeracy quite early.”

Read more here: https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/mar/15/children-learn-play-age-eight-lego?CMP=share_btn_fb&fbclid=IwAR0eFlVx17cm5oqq_ifw7_BvlfxlaIewp4I_IKERkcU4nxBcel59SkqDNtA

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