February 6, 2016

Marlborough parents feel home schooling suits their children

Marlborough mother says she has nothing against traditional schooling, but at home her children are free to learn “what they want, when they want”.

Niki Boon said her children learned primarily through books and observing the world, and her son Kurt would decide whether he wanted to go to high school.

Boon had home schooled all four of her children, aged between 6 and 12-years-old.

Boon and husband Rob Simcic decided home schooling suited their children better, she said.

“We just preferred our kids at home.”

READ MORE:
Home schooling: weird or wonderful?
School’s out, this time forever
‘The children decide what to learn’

They had a lot of freedom in how they structured their children’s day, Boon said.

“They have to learn ‘as much and as often’ as they would at school, but it’s really vague.”

The number of home schooled children in Marlborough climbed to 62 last year.

Fifty children were educated at home in 2014, although in previous years the numbers had reached 100.

The number of children enrolled in schools in Marlborough last year was more than 6600.

Boon knew of some home schooling parents who kept to a rigid timetable, but she did not dictate what her children had to learn and when.

The children had plenty of opportunities to socialise, sometimes with workers from all over the world who stayed on their Spring Creek property, Boon said.

To home school their children, parents had to apply for a certificate of exemption from the Ministry of Education.

Parents had to provide information to the ministry including a statement of their philosophy, what subjects they intended to teach, and a description of intended environmental, social and community contact.

Children who were home schooled could take NCEA exams through the Correspondence School or through a “link school”.

Twice a year parents had to make a declaration to the Ministry of Education that the home schooling was continuing. Students were allowed to “trial” a school for up to 10 weeks, without losing their home schooling status.

Fellow home schooling mother Veronika Merkle, originally from Germany, made the decision to home school her son Corbinian, 6, because she wanted him to grow up bilingual.

She also felt he was too young to be separated from the family.

While she hoped to home school him all the way through primary school, she would have to wait and see whether it suited him, she said.

“As they grow up they might have different needs, that we might struggle to meet,” she said.

Marlborough Boys’ College principal Wayne Hegarty said occasionally students who were home schooled would come to Marlborough Boys’ to do their NCEA exams.

“Some will do very well. It just varies, really.”

Two years ago, William Irwin-Harris, who was home schooled for most of his life, became proxime accessit to the dux.

“He was a very bright boy, and it was nice to see him grow in confidence,” Hegarty said.

William’s mother Jacqui Harris said he had just won a prize for mathematics at Victoria University.

Parent Smyth Brydon said her son attended Grovetown School, but her 8-year-old daughter Brooke was educated at home. She tried school for two years but decided she wanted to try learning at home.

“She’s a real free spirit, and I’m a real fan of following the children’s lead,” Brydon said.

“She [experienced school], and it was good, but at the end of the day she said ‘no, I still want to give this a go’,” Brydon said.

Brooke’s preschool teacher first suggested home schooling after Brydon said she was concerned Brooke was not ready for school. Initially Brydon was reluctant, but after she did some research into it she thought it would suit the family.

Brydon said she hoped Brooke would choose to keep learning at home, as she did not want her to feel the pressure to fit in as she got older.

Brooke was very self-motivated, Brydon said.

“If she wants to become a doctor, she’ll become a doctor. If she wants to become an artist, she’ll become an artist.”

Each year about 5500 New Zealand children were home schooled.

 - The Marlborough Express

Read more here and see photo:  http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/76571741/marlborough-parents-feel-home-schooling-suits-their-children.html

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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Homeschooling children in Victoria on the rise

PARENTS are increasingly turning their backs on traditional schooling and tutoring their children at home.

On the cusp of the new school year, the profile of homeschooling has been given a boost after a VCE student earned top marks for 2015 after a mix of home and distance education.

Figures show 4136 students were educated at home in Victoria last year, or 0.44 per cent of children, up from 3233 in 2012.

Bullying at school, disabilities, medical conditions and lifestyle choices are among the main reasons parents decide to teach their kids at home.

The story of Stephen Zhang, 17, who achieved the maximum 99.95 ATAR after being taught by his mum until year 10, has shone a spotlight on homeschooling.

Read the rest of the article here: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/homeschooling-children-in-victoria-on-the-rise/news-story/57bf6b9ec6c92a65b4c8bca2feb09007#load-story-comments

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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The Seduction of Homeschooling Families: Government Homeschooling Programs Seek to Eliminate Parents’ Choices for Their Children’s Education

Something to watch out for in New Zealand and Australia in the future:

Do the public school authorities feel threatened by homeschooling? Judging by their efforts to lure homeschooling families into dependence on local school districts, the answer is apparently yes.

For the last several years, homeschooling has been the fastest growing educational alternative in the country. Estimates of its growth rate typically range from 15 to 25 percent annually. Homeschoolers are notoriously difficult to count; however, the National Homeschooling Research Institute believes that currently 1.2 million children get their education at home. While that constitutes only about 2 percent of all school-age children, it’s more than 20 percent of those who are outside the government educational system. and, with a 20 percent annual growth rate, another quarter million children will join the homeschooling movement this year.

The sheer number of homeschoolers represents a distinct threat to the hegemony of the government school monopoly. Qualitatively, the academic success of homeschoolers, measured by standardized test scores and recruitment by colleges, debunks the myth that parents need to hire credentialed experts to force children to learn.

Homeschooling also refutes the “more money equals better education” mantra of the teachers unions. The average homeschooling family spends approximately 10 percent of the per-pupil costs associated with government schools in achieving those academic results.2 Multiplied by the number of homeschoolers, even these modest amounts add up to a sizeable market attracting numerous educational entrepreneurs.

Besides challenging the legitimacy of government schools, homeschoolers also pose a more direct economic threat. Funding for government schools is based on attendance, with a national average of almost $6,000 per student.3 Homeschooled children represent over $7 billion out of reach of local government schools, and, at its current growth rate, each year over $1 billion more slips away.

Politically, homeschoolers are a force to be reckoned with when their rights are endangered. The most highly publicized and effective example of their growing political clout occurred in 1994, when the House of Representatives inserted language into an educational appropriations bill that would have required all teachers to be credentialed. Homeschoolers perceived that provision as a threat to their autonomy and overwhelmed phone and fax lines to their representatives until the credentialing language was removed by a 424-1 vote.

Homeschooling’s economic and political impact is keenly felt by teachers unions, educational bureaucrats, ideological indoctrinators, and other beneficiaries of today’s system. What will happen when the growing number of homeschooling families withdraw their political support for the enormous taxes required to fund today’s $300 billion government system?

To combat those threats, defenders of the status quo are fighting back with all the legal, legislative, and economic weapons at their disposal. The most insidious of these tactics is the systematic undermining and co-opting of the homeschooling movement by establishing government homeschooling programs. Those programs set seductive lures before families by providing “free” resources, teachers, extracurricular activities, facilities, and even cash reimbursement.

When enough families have voluntarily returned to the government system, it will be a relatively straightforward matter to recapture the rest by imposing mandatory homeschooling oversight regulations. Will this seduction succeed in eliminating independent homeschoolers and derailing the growing free market in education? Economics and the history of private schools versus government schools provide ample lessons on what to expect.

The Birth of a Free Market in Education

The term “homeschooling” is a bit of a misnomer. To many people the word conjures up a vision of mom instructing her kids around the kitchen table–a myth perpetuated by the media, which invariably demand that particular image to illustrate their stories. The reality is far different. While instruction around the kitchen table does indeed occur in most homeschooling families, the flexibility and range of homeschooling encourages an enormous variety of alternative educational models. Those models range from child-led, interest-based learning (unschooling) to the traditional classroom model with professional teachers. They include distance learning, cooperative teaching arrangements between parents, commercial learning centers, and subject-specific tutors. Many young teenagers routinely take junior college or university courses. Others participate in the revival of apprenticing.

The homeschooling boom has not gone unnoticed by educational entrepreneurs. Homeschooling conferences attract huge numbers of vendors catering to the hundreds (and in some cases, thousands) of families attending. Traditional curriculum vendors have repackaged their wares specifically for the homeschooling market. Homeschooling magazines and newsletters flourish, increasing in number. Organizations providing paid support (curriculum counseling, bureaucratic paperwork assistance, legal support) for homeschooling families continue to spring up.

Supplementing these numerous commercial ventures and, in most cases, preceding them, are a multitude of local support groups that arose spontaneously to help meet the needs of new and existing homeschooling families. Much of the power of the homeschooling movement comes from these groups, through which families gather to meet the social and academic needs of their children. Those voluntary groups create the environment for low-cost or no-cost academic solutions, such as:

  • cooperative teaching, which leverages the existing talents and interests of parents;
  • information sharing among parents about what works and what doesn’t for different learning styles;
  • renting community rooms (or homes) for group activities and classes;
  • hiring professional teachers by the hour (for example, our science teacher is paid $75 an hour, which breaks down to $5 a child); and
  • field trips for hands-on learning.

Homeschooling support groups also provide all of the social activities found in traditional schools. One group, All Ways Learning in San Jose, is typical of the depth of activities provided by voluntary support groups once a critical mass of families is involved. The group meets twice weekly, once at a local park and once in a rented community room. Volunteer families organize the monthly newsletter, yearbook, yearly “school” pictures, monthly “PTA” meetings (aka “Parents’ Night Out”), holiday parties, dances, and choir. In addition, a homeschooling sports league in the area sponsors baseball, basketball, and soccer for several hundred homeschooled children. Homeschooling, with its varied commercial and volunteer ventures, is a microcosm of what a true free market in education could look like–parents and children working together, mixing and matching, tailoring the educational style to what works best for them; families spending their educational dollars as they choose, with educational entrepreneurs creating a wide-ranging marketplace of goods and services. It’s not just mom and the kids around the kitchen table. It’s a new educational model.

Be sure to read the rest of the article here:

https://fee.org/freeman/the-seduction-of-homeschooling-families/

 

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

 

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Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway

Picture

This is a reminder that the Getaway is in the not too distant future so now is the time to be booking it in on your calendar and booking your space at camp.  Remember, you can camp for extra days if you want to.  Some of our regular families spend a few extra days in camp enjoying an extended holiday time.

We had our biggest camp so far last Feb, so past the word around, share the love, and invite some more to join us in Feb 2016.  Below is the brochure with all the details on it.

The Drinnan Clan

Taupo

what’s happening …

The annual Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway is for Christian homeschooling families to connect with other families for mutual encouragement and friendship. It aims to be …

like-minded

There’s nothing more encouraging than knowing we are not alone in this awesome task of discipling our children at home. Meeting with others who are going through the same triumphs and struggles can lift a tired soul! And how important it is, for our children to have like-minded friends.

family-centred

This is a getaway for the whole family. Enjoy a weekend away or extend your time at the campsite and have a family holiday as well. This is not a camp/conference in the traditional sense, it is families relaxing together.

budget-conscious

Raising a family on a single income is no easy task but God is faithful. So being mindful of this, we have chosen to go to a conventional campsite. There are limited cabins available also. We will let you organise your own family’s food which is much cheaper than paying someone else to cook it and you can meet your own budget requirements.

fun-filled

We have a programme of fun games and activities for the young and not so young, and of course, we are camped right on the shores of beautiful Lake Taupo for swimming, boating, etc! We have a hall on site for fellowship, Sunday morning devotional, or in case it rains.

Friday

7:00 pm Meet in function room, introduce each family

8:00 pm Supper

Saturday

9:30 am Games for all who choose to participate

10:30 am Morning Tea

11:15 pm More Games

12:30 pm Lunch Break

1:30 pm Free time for swimming, fellowshipping, sightseeing, etc

6:00 pm Shared BBQ dinner by function room

7:00 pm Free time/board games in function room/swimming

Sunday

Please pack up your cabin by 10am

10.00 am Devotional Hour – some singing and some sharing

11:30 am Final pack up of tents etc and last swim at lake

any questions?

Murray & Sharon Drinnan  evergreen@farmside.co.nz

I am a companion of all who fear You, and of those who keep Your precepts – Psalm 119:63

TO REGISTER

To book your camping requirements:

Go to www.motuterebay.co.nz

  •  Choose your preferred camping choice.

    Arrival time – 2:00pm onwards Friday, 12 Feb 2016.Departure time – 11:30am Sunday, 14 Feb 2016

  • Book directly with the camp for the weekend of 12-14 Feb 2016. Mention that you are with the Christian Homeschoolers Family Sumer Getaway.
  • You are responsible for your deposit payment, and on arriving at camp, all outstanding payments.
  • Tent sites are priced $18.00 per person over 14yrs. Children 5-14yrs $9.00. Under 5yrs $5.00. A limited number of cabins and flats are available. Prices are subject to change, please see website.
  • Day visitors are welcome for Saturday. Cost: half price of tent site prices. Book directly with the camp. Mention that you are with the Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway. Please park in the visitors carpark and you are required to depart by 9:00pm.
  • Please note that the showers and laundry facilities are coin operated. If you have any queries about the camp facilities, please ask them directly.
  • Check out the website, it is a beautiful place to camp!

To register for the Christian Homeschoolers Family Summer Getaway:

  • Send an email stating your intention to attend either the whole weekend or as day visitors on Saturday, and the number of adults and children, with their ages, to: evergreen@farmside.co.nz
  • To cover the cost of hall hireage and games, pay $20 per family in cash at Getaway to Murray or Sharon
  • You are responsible for preparing and bringing your own food, cutlery, plates, washing up, etc, for all your meals. The camp has very good kitchen facilities. For the Saturday night shared BBQ, bring your own meat and drinks for your family, and two plates of food (salads, potato dishes, for example) to share. We will provide a gas BBQ to cook the meat on.
  • Please do not bring any alcohol to the Getaway.
  • You are responsible for the supervision, care, and behaviour of your own children.
  • You are responsible for all your camping needs e.g. tents, bedding, etc. 12 – 14 FEB 2016

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

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Need help on global homeschool research

Dear Parent (or someday parent),

We invite and encourage you to participate in some very important research related to homeschooling (or home education).

The purpose of this international research initiative is to identify, understand, and compare barriers that parents face in choosing to home educate their children.

Results of this study will be used to help equip parents to make more informed decisions in the education of their children, and to propose solutions for removing barriers to homeschooling.

Get started now. [ link http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2511422/1971b3fae031]. Click on the green arrow in the bottom right corner

Dr. Brian D. Ray is internationally known for his research on homeschooling. He is trusted by the global homeschool community and he is the investigator for this project.

All data will be confidentially analyzed. All results will be presented in an anonymous way. You will receive a free summary of the research results if you want one.

We urge you to help us with this internationally important project. Start here (Click on the green arrow in the bottom right corner. )

Sincerely,

Barbara Smith

Home Education Foundation

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

 

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