October 17, 2019

Why Teachers Choose to Homeschool Their Own Children


Why Teachers Choose to Homeschool Their Own Children

“Schools are different now, they’ve changed a lot you know!”

As a home educating parent I hear this a lot. People want to believe we just don’t know what goes on in schools, as if they operate in secret or something. Not the case, obviously.

You know who knows a lot about what schools are like? Teachers.

I recently read an article which made this very interesting point…

“In biology, there’s a descriptor – “indicator species”.  An indicator species may be unusually sensitive to environmental changes, and biologists monitor the indicator species for signs that something is amiss in the environment.

I wonder when somebody is going to notice that teachers are an indicator species. When we leave public schools with our children, people should consider that there’s something amiss.”

When I shared it online so many teachers contributed their stories about why they had chosen not to send their own children to school. Some of them made me angry, some made me sad, some made me feel super passionate, some made me feel hopeful, some made me feel hopeless. That’s too many feelings for one person, so I decided to share it with you, ha!

I hope the experiences shared here by teachers help in some way. Maybe they will help make the decision to homeschool easier, maybe you will feel less alone in your beliefs or observations, maybe they will give you a picture of what schools are really like.

Why Teachers Choose to Homeschool Their Own Children…

They have a huge amount of experience

Firstly, what I noticed when I read through all the stories was that these teachers had so much experience!

“I am home schooling my autistic granddaughter after being a primary teacher for 40 years.”

These were people who had been in the schooling system for a long time, who had studied education greatly, who absolutely do know what school is like.

“I’m a registered ECE teacher with 18 years experience. We have been homeschooling a year and it has blown my mind how many people I have met who are ex-teachers who now homeschool. There are HEAPS!”

“My husband and I are both educators with Masters degrees in our fields. Unschooling our kids allows us to follow what we know to be true about human development, good mental health practices, and childhood in general.”

“My husband is a Prof. and I have a M.Ed in special education”

The people that commented and sent me their stories were the people who had been in schools for a long time. The fact that they had spent so much of their life dedicated to education but still didn’t use it for their own children was already very telling.

They are disillusioned with the system

“Over the years, I’ve gone from thinking nothing of the system, to not liking it, to thinking it just doesn’t work anymore, and now I believe it was designed to fail kids.”

Over and over again, the stories conveyed a feeling of disillusionment.

“I became a teacher to make a difference in children’s lives, but was completely and quickly disillusioned with the environment teachers and children are in.”

“There is little to no support and the class sizes continue to climb while the funding continues to decrease. I finally decided I’d seen enough.”

“My dream was to integrate the outdoor, nature, garden, environment ed into the classroom. The reality is there is no time for anything but testing, testing prep, data analysis, meetings about data, meetings about tests, meetings about how to get the scores up, etc “

Teachers wanted to help and support children but realized that within our current system of schooling this wasn’t possible. They were dealing with data and standardization, not individual children. They were tied to a system that wanted them to implement teaching like robots, instead of responding to individual needs. In fact, they found that what they had learned about what is best for children and how they learn was not even being respected in schools. They literally couldn’t give children what they need. Test scores were more important.

“The things I’ve learned about motivation to learn are not being fostered in public schools. Things are being taught to children when it is not developmentally appropriate. Most schools are still giving young children homework, even when all the research shows it is not helpful. Anxiety around standardized tests is a huge problem. Recess time is being reduced. Teachers are over worked and underpaid. Until there is a major paradigm shift in the school climate, I will not be comfortable putting my kids in public school.”

“What hits it home for me is when you consider how long the school system has been in place. If a private company had been running this long, it would likely function like a well oiled machine, with a clear purpose and probably making good profit with efficient staff. Now, I realise schools aren’t the same as corporate businesses but the system has been around so long and it’s still a mess, no clear direction, no clear purpose, and by it’s own standards it’s failing, all of that even with lots of teachers working very hard and giving up lots of time. So when you look at a system that is as inefficient as schooling you have to question whether it’s the right thing to do.”

Toxic Socialization

As a homeschooler one of the first questions you get is ‘what about socialization?’ Somehow people have come to believe that schools teach healthy social skills. As we have all experienced, that is not the case. Teachers agreed…

“As for the social side for children – well, teachers are under so much pressure to reach targets that children often miss playtime and lunchtimes while over stressed teachers desperately try to justify how much support they are giving to reach those targets. Autistic children are still expected to reach targets too despite the reaction to pressure. It’s a hive of stress!”

“Schools function as virtual prisons. Very nice prisons, for sure, but with strict rules and consequences. Students who do not comply are punished, labeled, looked down on, thought of as less smart, and less likely to succeed in life.”

“In school, they only socialize with kids in their grade level and class and only during very limited times unless they’re breaking the rules.”

“You have all these very prison like ways of treating students. Lining up in silence, can’t use the toilet during lessons, any misbehaviour at all and you’re in isolation for the rest of the day, the school actually hired an ex-police officer to help them ‘police’ the corridors.”

Inadequate Education

“They just push them forward year after year even if they have not learnt the content and we were getting further and further behind. The class environment did not promote thinking, creativity, self reflection, resilience etc”

While school is supposed to be ‘educating‘ our children, and helping them learn, many teachers thought it was doing a very poor job. What they knew about learning prompted them to remove their children from the system.

“I actually felt like unschooling was more in line with what we learned about how people learn in my education courses. Of course, that looks so different than what you are expected to implement in the classroom, because it just isn’t possible to create a space for the non-linear creative way we learn when you are trying to move 30 people along at the same pace; and moving them along is necessary so they can test well so the school can have funds and resources (and you can have a job) for next year. It’s a terrible system if it’s viewed through the lens of how we naturally learn.”

“I am a teacher. We unschool. I occasionally still supply teach and every time I do, our choice to live the way we do is reinforced by what I experience in schools.”

“The heavy, exclusive focus on reading, writing and math, I feel, kills creativity in school. There is nothing wrong with those subjects but they can be learned alongside the students’ primary interests. When a child realizes that the problems they want to solve, the interests they want to pursue, and the goals they have can be achieved with the relevant math, reading, and writing skills, then they are motivated to learn those skills knowing that it helps them.”


Experiences From School and Teaching

The stories that saddened me the most were when people shared things they had observed in school, or how school had impacted their children. They speak for themselves…more in link below

Having Their Own Children Gave Them a New Perspective…more in link below

Read the rest of the article here: http://happinessishereblog.com/2018/10/why-teachers-choose-to-homeschool-their-own-children/?fbclid=IwAR3VDrcZyTQtuld_t5FFfq5BKRxI-0C5iX8t1h0KgSDfdydNsLfMoB8CdhM?

Why do teachers choose to homeschool their own children? It seems because they are educated, they know what school is like, and they want the best for their children. I think that’s telling.

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You can read the full stories shared by teachers in the link below. Thank you so much to everyone who contributed.

Read the full stories shared by teachers here: http://happinessishereblog.com/2018/10/why-teachers-choose-to-homeschool-their-own-children/?fbclid=IwAR3VDrcZyTQtuld_t5FFfq5BKRxI-0C5iX8t1h0KgSDfdydNsLfMoB8CdhM

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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When Your Homeschooled Child Isn’t a Prodigy

Accept your children for who they are, not who you envision them to be.

“Yesterday my kids and I watched Wonder for the umpteenth time. As with what usually happens when I’ve watched something once too many times, my mind started drifting and ended up – you guessed it – focusing on how this movie perpetuates some common homeschool stereotypes.

“If you’ve seen this film, you might be assuming that I’m referring to the fact that August’s mother has decided to send him to school for “socialization,” and while that does irritate me just a bit, that’s not what I’m referring to today. 

“Today I want to take a look at the notion that homeschoolers tend to fall on one of two spectrums: they’re either hopelessly ignorant or they’re freakishly smart. I think you and I both know that that isn’t really the case.

“In this movie, August’s classmate’s automatically jump to the conclusion that he knows absolutely nothing, when, in fact, he is extremely intelligent and puts them in their place more than once. Am I complaining about that? No way. I think it’s awesome that he was portrayed in a way that shoots down the “all homeschoolers are dumb” mentality.

“What it did bring to mind, however, is that we homeschooling parents tend to compare our families with others a bit too much, and truth be told, very often the only positive stories we hear about homeschooling from the media are about those families who have produced child prodigies. You know the type. Speaking three languages by the age of four, graduating with a Master’s degree by the age of 12, and doctor by the ripe old age of 19.

“Although hearing stories like that are inspiring and make me even prouder to be a homeschool mom, let’s be honest. It can make it very hard for those of us whose children don’t fall into the prodigy category to accept the fact that we are still doing a phenomenal job with our children. We are not “less than.” More importantly, our children aren’t, either.

“So today I want to encourage you with this one thing I’ve learned over the ten years we’ve been homeschooling:

Academic excellence should never be your primary goal.

“While it is certainly something we should all hope to help our kids attain, the fact is that there are far more important things we need to teach them first.

“Things like:

Click here to see the more important things our writer is suggesting: https://redheadmom8.wordpress.com/2018/12/11/homeschooled-child-isnt-prodigy/?fbclid=IwAR1OLuvv1_ORF0PwY5j-FvxYQrRAPdp1WHTM9B7NnPS0reSSuz5dvq1Fp1o

Armed with those qualities, our children will be well-equipped to face anything that comes their way as they travel into adulthood.

In this day and age, my friends, people with those qualities are anything but normal……. so if you ask me, they are the ones we need the most.

Homeschooling and education are my passion. It is my fervent hope to one day devote more time to creating content for you. If you’d like to support this ministry, consider supporting me on Patreon.

“Thank you so much. I appreciate each and every one of you!”

More here:

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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Public School Kindergarten Is Not Free

"Free" written on chalkboard

Is free really free? Parents have choices, and one of the most important choices parents must make is where to put their children for childcare and school. Southwest Florida has many pre-K programs, and of course when it comes to kindergarten most kids just go to the public school and not private schools or Grace Community School. The differences between these programs may not be obvious at first glance.

Let’s start with preschool. A lot of parents are under the impression that preschool is an all-day thing. Sadly, this usually isn’t the case. Most pre-K programs in Florida opt to do a 3-hour daily program so that their state funds can stretch through the whole year. Parents who need more than those 3 hours must purchase wraparound care for an added fee. Not here. Grace Community School’s pre-k program is now an all-day program — 6:30am to 6:00pm, no wraparound care needed! So instead of three hours of learning, students at Grace Community School participate in learning that lasts the entire day. As they say on TV, “But wait, there’s more!”

Image: Canva
Image: Canva

There is no comparison between the learning at Grace Community School versus other daycares. A lot of parents are interested in state-funded pre-K because it’s a “good deal.” What makes something a good deal? It means you’re getting more for your money and effort than you would be getting elsewhere, right? “Free” sounds like a good deal. You wouldn’t think that you could get a better deal than something that’s free. But you have to be careful. “Free” comes with strings attached. Is “free” worth it if it isn’t what’s best for your child? One of the most crucial things you will give up when choosing a free preschool program is reading instruction. I’m not talking about “reading readiness,” but real, actual reading.

Read the rest of this article here:

Public School Kindergarten Is Not Free

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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Christians in Public Schooling: Comfortable in Slavery

Douglas Pietersma, Ed.S.

No doubt you have heard the anecdote of how a frog dropped into boiling water will react violently and do everything possible to escape. In contrast, a frog placed in tepid water, heated slowly, will lethargically accept the situation without any attempt to escape inevitable death. In full disclosure, I’ve never attempted to prove or disprove this by experimentation, nor do I plan to do so. The analogy is nevertheless applicable to things we become accustomed to over long periods of time, that we otherwise would react to violently if they occurred abruptly.

Education, specifically as it pertains to Christian families, is one such case. So how did America go from being a nation of Christian founders (Eidsmoe, 2012), who crafted this country without the benefit of compulsory public education (Cox, 2003, p. 506), to a nation of compulsory schooling where Secular Humanism has become the religion of the state, confirmed by ardent humanists themselves (Dunphy, 1983, p.26)? How did public schools become the churches (Cox, 2003, p. 296) for the propagation of this faith? The answers, just like the frog.

It all started with one small step away from the Word of God, which clearly assigns responsibility for the education of children to the parents (Deuteronomy 6:4-9, Ephesians 6:4, Proverbs 22:6). Christian parents first allowed for local one-room school houses, then other community schools, being convinced that these organizations were effectively and appropriately teaching biblical morals, values and character. Schools got bigger, government became involved and over time the content of that education became not only secular, but ant-Christian, anti-Bible, anti-God and anti-character. A comprehensive review of this history is beyond the scope of this article, but it should suffice to say that it wasn’t until the late 1970s (Green & Hoover-Dempsey, 2007), and the decade thereafter (Wayne, 2017, p. 178), when some Christian families woke up to the realization that their children were being boiled alive in the cauldron of public schooling. Thus, an explosion ignited the modern Christian homeschooling movement and gave rise to many church schools, which I grew up attending.

Read the rest of the article here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/christians-public-schooling-comfortable-slavery-pietersma-ed-s-/?fbclid=IwAR1y4L6mKOgbYc-oRMzowBVMjgkzcGykw8EvBCSotwLBPnA1OBKvS7N4uQAT

————————————————————————————————————

Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Please like & share:

The Right Brain Develops First ~ Why Play is the Foundation for Academic Learning

The Right Brain Develops First ~ Why Play is the Foundation for Academic Learning

SPhoto credit: Allan Ajifo/flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Did you know that the right brain develops first? It does so by the time children are 3-4 years of age. The left brain, on the other hand, doesn’t fully come online until children are approximately seven years old; hence the first seven years being recognized as such a critical period in child development.

“Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” ~ Albert Einstein

The left brain’s functionality is one of language, numeracy, literacy, analysis and time. It is the logical, calculating, planning, busy-bee part of us that keeps us anchored in the pragmatic world, and in past and future. The right brain, on the other hand, is responsible for empathy, intuition, imagination and creativity. It is where we wonder, dream, connect and come alive. Through the right brain we dwell in the space of no-time, in being absolutely present. While the left brain is more interested in outcomes or product, the right brain cares much more about process—the journey is what matters, not the destination. 

But there is one more vital piece to understand: The right brain connects us to our boundless sense of being. Being is primary; hence the right brain developing first; hence, human being, not human doing. The left brain is far more interested in doing. Young right-brain dominant children, by contrast, are quite content being.

Understanding this we can better appreciate why play is so important in child learning and development, and why we need to be extra careful with the amount and timing of academic agendas created for children; with how much we emphasize product—what kids have accomplished at school—versus process—who they are becoming and what they feel in their explorations. That the right brain develops first is pertinent information for those in the field of education, as well as parents, regarding what is developmentally appropriate. Pushing literacy and numeracy on children before age seven may just be harmful to their little, developing brains. Without the capacity to use their academic minds in the ways that are being asked can cause children to gain what’s called “learned stupidity.” They believe themselves to be incapable and lose their natural desire to learn.

The push for academia on children is a symptom of a society that is left brain dominant, or forgetful of the wonderful playground that is the right brain. It’s an indicator that we feel safer within the literalness, control and certainty of the left brain, far more than in the unquantifiable and mysterious nature the right brain connects us to.

You cannot measure the qualitative aspects of imagination, empathy and intuition; but, of course, you can measure the aforementioned practical detail-oriented functions associated with the left brain. Yet the more we push those things that can be measured onto children, the more they will grow up feeling like they don’t measure up!

Read the rest of the article here: https://www.vincegowmon.com/the-right-brain-develops-first/?fbclid=IwAR3Bm8ZlB17DqCGZxeqL5cKqOimoWC1OqkARwx89omy2F5eyuF_4760Mc8U

Here is a TED Talk guaranteed to provide inspiration and more practical knowledge on the matter. Enjoy!

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Check out Vince’s book: Let the Fire Burn ~ Nurturing the Creative Spirit of Children, A Children’s Book for Adults

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Please like & share:

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