March 25, 2017

WHY I’M THROUGH WITH HOMESCHOOLING

A great article to read:

As many longtime readers know, we homeschooled our two daughters, now both graduated. We live on a rural 20-acre homestead on which we are endeavoring to become food self-sufficient. With a home business, the kids grew up with both parents constantly present and involved. With the blessings of God, we were able to give our girls what has become increasingly rare in modern society: an old-fashioned, home-oriented, wholesome childhood.

When I first started writing this column in April 2008, our daughters were 12 and (almost) 10 years old, smack in the middle of their formative educational years. Currently they are 21 and (almost) 19. Seems hard to believe they’re both young adults now. How has homeschooling worked for them?

Most homeschooling parents, over the years, receive the usual litany of ignorant censure and snarks from self-appointed critics. “What about socialization!” “Won’t your kids grow up stunted and ignorant?” “Why can’t you just be normal?”

Back when homeschooling was still something of a novelty, no one knew what the long-term effects of parental teaching would be like. (Historical examples of successful home education were, of course, dismissed.) Would our children grow up to be unsocial, stunted, ignorant, abnormal and unable to function in modern society?

Of course not. But it wasn’t until Dr. Brian Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute started quantifying and statistically analyzing the long-term “legacy effect” of homeschooling that it was numerically justified in the eyes of the wider world. Society began realizing what parents and defenders have known for decades: Homeschooling works. It works beautifully. It doesn’t just work academically; it works emotionally, intellectually, morally, psychologically, sexually and just about any other factor that can be made into an adverb.

At a time when general lunacy is the norm in public schools, at a time when teachers blatantly admit their goal is to brainwash students, my husband and I knew the only option was to teach the children ourselves (private schools aren’t available in our remote rural area). Interestingly, because our local public school district is so bad, many of the rural children around us are homeschooled as well, so we found ourselves surrounded by a vibrant community of families with similar goals. Our girls never lacked for friends.

So where are our daughters now? How did homeschooling work for them?

Besides volunteer work at county animal shelter, the first paid job both girls held was working as housekeepers for an upscale motel owned by friends. (Oddly, this provoked sneers of contempt from a certain unnamed critic who claimed maid work was demeaning. He never explained why.) In this job, our daughters honed their time management and efficiency skills, and earned glowing letters of recommendation.
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2017/03/why-im-through-with-homeschooling/#VGtlHGw7ukhu4Lkt.99

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Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

 

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Homeschooling is the smartest way to teach kids in the 21st century

Alison Davis doesn’t see homeschooling as some strange alternative to traditional school.

If anything, says the mum from Williamstown, New Jersey, when it comes to raising her two children, she’s doing the sensible thing.

“You’re not going to be put in a work environment where everybody came from the same school and everybody is the same age,” she tells Business Insider. “In my opinion, the traditional school atmosphere is not the real world at all.”

Homeschooling, she says, that’s the real world.

Davis’ satisfaction with keeping her kids out of local public and private schools is one shared by a growing pool of parents around the US. Recent data collected by the Department of Education reveals homeschooling has grown by 61.8% over the last 10 years to the point where two million kids — 4% of the total youth population — now learn from the comfort of their own home.

Contrary to the belief that homeschooling produces anti-social outcasts, the truth is that some of the most high-achieving, well-adjusted students are poring over maths problems at their kitchen table, not a desk in a classroom. According to leading pedagogical research, at-home instruction may just be the most relevant, responsible, and effective way to educate children in the 21st century.

Personalisation is key

In his 2015 book “Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education,” veteran teacher and beloved TED speaker Ken Robinson emphasises that students learn best at their preferred speeds and in their preferred manner. “All students are unique individuals with their own hopes, talents, anxieties, fears, passions, and aspirations,” he writes. “Engaging them as individuals is the heart of raising achievement.”

Robinson wasn’t referring to homeschooling directly, but he might as well have been. No form of education is designed to foster more personalised tutelage.

While traditional schools try their best to tailor lesson plans to individual students, teachers often still end up teaching to the middle. There are simply too many kids learning at different speeds for teachers to give each of them exactly what they need. Homeschooling, meanwhile, is personal by design.

Davis says her son Luke struggled early on with reading. Even into the second grade, he didn’t enjoy it and found it overwhelming. In any other school, teachers may not have been able to spend the necessary time helping Luke become a stronger reader because they had 20 other kids to worry about. That’s not the case in the Davis household.

“I could take that extra time with him,” Davis says. Plus, reading time became more than just a push toward literacy; it was Mummy-Luke bonding time — something no school could compete with. “Now he devours books in like a week’s time or less,” she says.

The long-term effects of personalisation are equally massive. According to a 2009 study of standardised testing, homeschoolers scored in the 86th percentile. The results held true even when controlling for parents’ income level, amount of education, teaching credentials, and level of state regulation. Research also suggests that homeschooled kids get into college more often and do better once they’re enrolled.

No, homeschooling doesn’t create recluses

The biggest stereotype surrounding homeschooling is that constant one-on-one teaching deprives kids of the socialisation they need to thrive. Not so. Homeschooled kids are just as likely to play soccer and do group projects as any other students.

Davis’ family is heavily involved in their local church, so Luke and his older sister Amanda both have friends in the choir. They both play an instrument, so they have friends in a homeschooler orchestra. They hang with kids on their block. Amanda has a pen pal who lives in Arizona. As far as childhood goes, theirs is pretty run-of-the-mill.

It’s not just that homeschooled kids enjoy the upside of normal school, though; they also get to enjoy the absence of its many drawbacks — namely peer pressure and cliques. On several occasions, Alison says, other kids have expressed jealousy that Luke and Amanda get to learn at home, away from the social hierarchies of normal school.

“They’re like, Aw man, I wish I got be homeschooled,” she says. “I’ve been very surprised by it.”

Of course, some parents do struggle to help their kids make friends.

Earlier this year, I interviewed an extremely bright 7-year-old named Akash who lives in San Angelo, Texas. He’s homeschooled because a child psychologist who studied him when he was a toddler told his parents it was probably the smartest option.

Akash’s best friend — maybe his only friend — is his big sister, Amrita. Most of the kids in his nearby homeschoolers’ association are either too old or too dissimilar in personality for his parents to schedule regular playdates, even though Akash is silly and outgoing.

But even for kids who do struggle, trends suggest the Internet is making it easier. A Pew survey from last year revealed that 55% of all teens say they regularly spend time with friends online or through social media, and 45% say they meet through extracurriculars, sports, or hobbies, which suggests classrooms aren’t the only way to make friends.
Read more at https://www.businessinsider.com/why-kids-should-get-homeschooled-2016-8#KuPvto74MgLXWPsz.99

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Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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Wolsey Hall Oxford

Dear Barbara,

I really like your website and wondered if you would be interested in hearing about Wolsey Hall Oxford.

Wolsey Hall Oxford, established in 1894, is a not-for-profit distance learning course provider. We supply courses for homeschoolers round the world aged 7-18 including Primary, Secondary, IGCSE and A level courses. We have recently been experiencing an increase in students enrolling from New Zealand.

You can find out more about Wolsey Hall Oxford by visiting our website and Wikipedia page as follows:

www.wolseyhalloxford.org.uk

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolsey_Hall,_Oxford

We are particularly proud of the fact Nelson Mandela used Wolsey Hall Oxford to study for his University of London Law degree whilst in Robben Island jail – an inspiration for distance learners everywhere!

If there is any other way you would like us to contribute, please let us know.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Kind regards,

Callum Wilcock

Student Engagement Co-ordinator

Tel: 0800 622 6599  | Skype: callumewilcock | Wolsey Hall Oxford Ltd, Midland House, West Way, Oxford, OX2 0PH|

www.wolseyhalloxford.org.uk | Registered in England No. 6781213

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Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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Home School Mentioned In Trump’s Plan For First 100 Days

From Homeschool Base

Yesterday president elect Donald J. Trump released a plan outlining what he hoped to accomplish during the first 100 days of his presidency.

Throughout the election most homeschoolers were painfully aware that neither candidate spent very much time addressing homeschooling and their plans for education. On the one hand, Hillary has a long track record of statements about homeschooling, many of which were taken from her book, It Takes a Village, on amazon. The HSLDA was already preparing for Clinton. On the other hand, during Trump’s campaign he only mentioned homeschooling (specifically) one time. Nevertheless, Trump did make it very clear during his campaign that he wants to abolish Common Core.

Now that Trump is president elect, he has released a plan for his first 100 days.

Education reform during Trump’s first 100 days

Taken from Trump’s first 100 day plan:

4. School Choice And Education Opportunity Act. Redirects education dollars to give parents the right to send their kid to the public, private, charter, magnet, religious or home schoolof their choice. Ends common core, brings education supervision to local communities. It expands vocational and technical education, and make 2 and 4-year college more affordable.

In a campaign ad, Trump said: “Common Core is a total disaster. We can’t let it continue.” And from earlier this year: “Get rid of Common Core — keep education local!” His definition of school choice, “School choice means that parents can homeschool their children… 100%”

great-again

Trump has not gone back on his word. Because this act found its way into his first 100 days, it is clear that this is one of the issues that Trump will be fighting for the hardest.

The question then becomes, how will this be implemented and what does it really mean for homeschoolers? Trump’s views and opinions on homeschooling were published along with his other plans in his book: Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America – via amazon.

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Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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Malta: Please help the home educators in Malta by signing this petition

Please sign this petition to help the home educating families in Malta

Ministry of Education: More Voice to Legalize Homeschooling in Malta – Sign the Petition!

Petition now does not  have an end time – so please sign if you have not done so already

Map of Malta

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Needing help for your home schooling journey: http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

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