July 25, 2014


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Kate Middleton Leaving Kensington Palace for the Countryside? Royal Mom Wants to Homeschool George

Kate

Is Kate Middleton about to leave her new home at Kensington Palace for a spacious and more private, countryside estate? Reports have surfaced alleging Middleton wants more privacy so that she can begin homeschooling son George, who will turn one next month.

It’s the same place that Princes William and Harry grew up in, which made moving in all the more significant for the royal family. Memories of the young princes were evoked, especially once Prince George was born. However, it appears that George is the main reason for Middleton even considering moving her family to Anmer Hall, their country estate. It would allow for greater privacy and allow the royals to be more “regular” people and fit in with the locals.

Read more here: http://www.christianpost.com/news/kate-middleton-leaving-kensington-palace-for-the-countryside-royal-mom-wants-to-homeschool-george-121816/

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Scotland is no longer a land of freedom

Scotland is no longer a land of freedom. The Scottish Parliament passed a bill today called the “Children and Young People (Scotland) bill.” This bill states that every child under the age of 18 will have a state appointed ‘named person’ who will engage in ‘corporate parenting.’ The purpose of this bill is to ensure that all children are taught and raised in a manner approved by the Scottish state.

Children’s Minister Aileen Campbell, pictured with Education Secretary Mike Russell, said the bill would transform family services in Scotland

“Increased provision of free childcare is part of a package of reforms which have been approved by MSPs.

“Increasing support for young people in care and the appointment of a “guardian” for every child in Scotland also form part of the bill.

“The bill will see an increase in free childcare for three, four and vulnerable two-year-olds, from 475 to 600 hours – around 16 hours per week – from August.

“A bid from Labour to give vulnerable two-year-olds a legal right to care was defeated at the committee stage, as was a Tory proposal to guarantee that all children get two years of nursery care before school, regardless of when their birthday falls. (Watch for this to come up again in the future)

“The bill will also extend free school meals to all children in the first three years of primary school, from January 2015.

“Meanwhile, the plan to appoint a so-called guardian for every Scottish child has been opposed by some religious groups and the Conservatives.

“The proposal to appoint specific named persons from the NHS and councils to monitor every young person’s well-being from birth to 18 is considered one of the most controversial aspects of the bill.

“Both the Church of Scotland and the Evangelical Alliance Scotland said the bill raised concerns about diminishing the position of parents and increasing the role of the state in modern society.

“Conservative education spokeswoman Liz Smith tabled a last-minute amendment that will be debated before MSPs vote.

“Ms Campbell insisted appointing a named person for every child would “provide a safety net for those who need one”. (But take away the freedoms of most families)

“The debate on the Children and Young People Bill can be watched on demand at BBC Scotland’s Democracy Live website.

 The debate as it happened in the Scottish parliament

 For more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-26208628

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New Zealand Politicians have been talking about this too. Craig wrote about it a lot in TEACH Bulletins.

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Please feel free to repost, forward or pass on  this email

Please do so with the whole post. Thankyou

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From the Smiths:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/craig-smith-26-january-1951-to-30-september-2011/

Updated 2 February 2013:  One year on (Craig Smith’s Health) page 7 click here

*****

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting started: http://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemption: http://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

US education model creates assembly-line workers

This article is worth reading by Kylie Smith

“I can’t predict the future,” said the Nashville rocker Webb Wilder, “but I can take a hint.” There are lots of hints that education is about to change.

Our current models are as dusty and broken. They’re too expensive, they’re too rigid, they don’t meet the needs of the students and they waste massive amounts of time.

We created an assembly-line system meant to churn out assembly-line workers, writes law professor Glenn Reynolds in his book “The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself” (Encounter Books). The bell rings, you move to where the schedule puts you, the bell rings again, you do as you’re told. Everyone gets processed in the same way, and at the end of the line you emerge with a certificate of quality.

“How many 19th century business models do you see flourishing, here in the 21st?” asks Reynolds.

Education must now do more than create factory workers, yet it remains one of the few areas of life almost untouched by technology (apart from dopey ideas to give iPads to kids). Why can’t school be as individually tailored to your needs as your computer’s desktop? And why, in an age in which more and more luxuries become affordable, does schooling keep getting more expensive (outpacing even the growth of health-care spending) even as test scores remain roughly flat?

New solutions are already here. Reynolds points out that his teen daughter calculated that, of every eight hours spent in school, only about 2¹/2 was actually spent learning, with the rest being wasted on DARE lectures and other nonacademic activities. She enrolled in an online high school, graduated at 16 and was accepted at a selective university. Meanwhile, the flexibility of her schedule allowed her to hold down a good job — researching and writing for programs shown on the Biography Channel and A&E.

Spending less time with fellow teens and more with adults is likely to be an instructive process. We think of teenagers as products of biology — they act that way because of their raging hormones — but really they’re a social construct. Teens spend bored years sheltered from reality (in California, you can’t even get a paper route until you’re 18) and herded together with others the same age. Popularity with peers may depend on engaging in risky behaviors like drug-taking and early sex.

A hundred years ago, we didn’t have “teenagers” — we had young adults and apprentices who were expected to produce, not just consume, and contributed a third of family income. Young people mostly were surrounded by adults and learned adult values and habits like punctuality and responsibility.

To read more of this article click here,,,,,,

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From the Smiths:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/craig-smith-26-january-1951-to-30-september-2011/

Updated: 30 September 2013:  One year on (Craig Smith’s Health) page 7 click here

*****

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting started: http://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemption: http://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading/

Successful parenting without spending money: a mother’s story

This article is well worth reading:

Sickened by the whole whirl of ‘kiddy consumerism’, eight months ago Hattie Garlick did something radical and decided to opt out altogether. So how are she and two-year-old Johnny faring?
Hattie Garlick with her two-year-old son, Johnny, at home

Hattie Garlick with her two-year-old son, Johnny, at home Photo: LAURA HYND

How had I got here? A fortnight before, I’d blithely started a blog, Free our Kids, that would chart a year-long personal challenge: could I go a whole year without spending any money on children’s products for my son? In retrospect, I hadn’t thought a great deal about it…

To read the rest of this article click here……

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From the Smiths:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/craig-smith-26-january-1951-to-30-september-2011/

Updated: 30 September 2013:  One year on (Craig Smith’s Health) page 7 click here

*****

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting started: http://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemption: http://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

Exemption Form online:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

This link is motivational:http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Coming Events:http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading/

New figures show rates of children being homeschooled doubles in Australia

 
Jane Hope with children Miriam, Sally and Caleb

Jane Hope with her children, Miriam, Sally and Caleb. Picture: Lawrence Pinder. Leader

THE number of children being homeschooled in Victoria is skyrocketing, yet unlike other states, there are no checks in place here to monitor standards.

And the Victorian Department of Education’s senior media officer, Stuart Teather, is refusing to comment on whether safeguards would be implemented in the future, saying only that all complaints were followed up to ensure children received “appropriate education”.

Would you homeschool your child, and should there be checks in place to ensure it is being done properly? Tell us below – (Here:
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/more-children-being-homeschooled/story-fngnvlxu-1226620651388)

Between 2008 and 2012, the number of Victorian children registered to be homeschooled almost doubled, according to the Government’s Victorian Registration & Qualifications Authority.

Numbers jumped from 1829 children in 2008 to 3435 children last year.

Since 2011, the number of homeschooled children has increased by about 10 per cent each year.

In the Queensland homeschool system, annual reports with samples of the child’s work must be submitted to the Government’s Homeschool Education Unit to log their progress.

In NSW, before a parent’s registration to homeschool is accepted, an education official visits the home and assesses documentation showing how the child will be schooled. Applications can be rejected if they are deemed unsatisfactory.

In Victoria, these checks do not exist.

Instead, parents are only required to register their children and sign a yearly commitment form.

“It is a requirement of registration that parents must commit to providing regular and efficient instruction that substantially addresses eight learning areas,” Mr Teather said…

Social children prove critics wrongGEMBROOK homeschooling mum Jane Hope laughs when asked whether her three children are socialised enough.

“Anyone who thought homeschooling meant that children were not socialised properly would change their minds if they met my kids, who are very confident and happy,” she said.

Mrs Hope said she was not “anti-school” but felt strongly that a homeschooling environment was ideal for Caleb, 10, Miriam, 8, and Sally, 3.

She said her husband Steve, who worked full time, was also involved with the children’s education.

Mrs Hope has homeschooled since Caleb was 3 1/2 years old and said a typical day could include cooking lessons, gardening, history and excursions.

“I start the children’s day with 45 minutes each of book work – reading, writing, spelling – and I like that so I can look at what they are doing.”

Mrs Hope said she interacted with other homeschooling families and friends several times a week and operated on an “education barter system”.

A Portuguese speaker, Mrs Hope said she would take groups for language lessons at the family’s 9ha property and then another parent might cook the family dinner or teach her children to sew.

“I always look at what is successful for my children and what their interests are and tailor their learning.”

Mrs Hope said she wanted to homeschool her children through secondary school but would take a “wait and see” approach.

Caleb said he was curious to experience a traditional classroom setting but loved the way he learned.

Nothing but praise for homeschooling

SELF-DISCIPLINE, self-motivated learning – and cheap holidays – are major perks of homeschooling.

That’s according to Wantirna mother of three Janet Himstedt, who has been homeschooling her children for the past six years.

Although they are primary-school aged, she fully intends to homeschool them until they are 18.

Mrs Himstedt discovered homeschooling after moving to Thailand, where the only other option her family faced was international schools.

When the Leader visited the Himstedts’ home it was a hive of activity.

Jada, 12, was at the piano learning scales.

Haven, 7, was at her laptop in the “school room” surrounded by books, charts and a skeleton affectionately known as Billy Bones.

And in the backyard, Tia, 9, was at recess, playing by herself.

Mrs Himstedt, who is not a qualified teacher, does not follow a set curriculum but formulates her own, depending on her children’s interests and needs.

She pulls together lesson plans from both the US and Australia.

Subjects are often taught online or through a video.

The girls meet up with other homeschooled children as part of a group called the Melbourne East Co-op, which is a support group for homeschool parents and their children.

Here they take classes such as sport, dance or music.

There are more than 50 families on the MEC waiting list.

With homeschooling comes the flexibility of class time and term time.

To read the rest of the article and to comment please go to: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/more-children-being-homeschooled/story-fngnvlxu-1226620651388

 

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