December 11, 2016


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2015 Homeschooling Statistics in NZ

 

Map of New Zealand

The 2015 Home Schooling Statistic for 2015 are now on the MoE website.

Homeschooling

“This index page provides links to data on homeschooling.

“As at 1 July 2015, there were 5,558 home schooled students recorded in the Ministry of Education’s Homeschooling database. These students belong to 2,916 families and represent 0.7% of total school enrolments as at 1 July 2015. Out of the 5,558 homeschoolers 66.5% were the aged 12 or under, 66.6% had been home-schooled for less than 5 years, and only 4.4% had been home-schooled for 10 years or more.

“European/P?keh? students are more likely to be homeschooled than any other ethnic group with 81.5% of all homeschoolers identifying as European/P?keh? compared to 52.3% of the total school population. Only 7.6% of homeschoolers identify as M?ori compared to 23.6% of the total school population, 2.0% of homeschoolers identify as Pasifika compared to 9.8% of the total school population, and 2.1% of homeschoolers identify as Asian compared to 10.6% of the total school population. The ethnicity of 2.7% of homeschoolers is unknown.

“The chart below provides a number of downloads relating to the number of students in Homeschooling.”

Homeschooling Students Time Series Downloads: File Type & Size 

The concern we have had every year when the statistics are released is the same again this year with about a 1,000 children beginning home education and about 1000 finishing home education each year. These are the statistics that are of concern: “21.6% had been in homeschooling less than a year, 36.4% had been in homeschooling for 1 – 5 years”

Homeschooling Turnover

“Between 1 July 2014 and 1 July 2015 there was an overall net increase of 3 students; 1,032 students entered into homeschooling and 1,029 students finished homeschooling.

“The average age of the 1,032 students entering into homeschooling was 8 years old, 86.6% were aged 12 or under and 1.0% were age 16 or above. Of the students entering homeschooling during the year ending 1 July 2015, 75.0% identified as European/P?keh?, 10.1% identified as M?ori, 3.4% identified as Pasifika, 2.9% identified as Asian, and 2.1% of homeschoolers ethnicity were unknown.

“The average age of the 1,029 students finishing homeschooling was 14 years old, 38.4% were aged 12 or under, and 24.5% were 16-years old or above. Of the students finishing homeschooling during the year ending 1 July 2015, 21.6% had been in homeschooling less than a year, 36.4% had been in homeschooling for 1 – 5 years, and 12.5% had been in homeschooling for 10 years or more. The average time spent in homeschooling of leaving students was 4.4 years.

“The chart below provides a number of one-on-one dimensional tables relating to student numbers.”

Homeschooling One-on-One Table Downloads:File Type & Size 

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Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading/

 

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NCHENZ Survey – please consider filling it out

From NCHENZ – National Council of New Zealand

The NCHENZ would like to hear from all Home Educators not just members.

The 2015 Home Education Survey

February 2015

As you may remember we ran our first Home Education survey in November 2013.  We chose to do this because there were very few studies of home education carried out in New Zealand and therefore very little understanding of the breadth and depth of the community.  This continues to be the case. (From HEF: The Home Education Foundation via TEACH Bulletin did a few survey’s back in the ’80s and ’90s but there have been none in the last 15 or so years except for NCHENZ’s survey back in 2013.)

We are once again hoping to gain a good overview of our existing NCHENZ members; your aims, your concerns and, of course, some basic statistics.
The gathered results may be used to promote the positive aspects of home education, as well as to dispel any myths or misunderstandings held by others in the wider community.  It also informs the direction and issues the NCHENZ committee address within our advocacy role.

Please note that this survey is anonymous.  We are not collecting any identifiable information about respondents with one specific exception which will become clear when you reach the end of the survey.  In this instance it is totally voluntary to answer this question.
Individual responses within the survey will not be shared.  Collated information can and may be shared.  Please see how the 2013 information has been handled by clicking on this link to the Survey Summary pdf file.

As you are not identifiable, we ask that you respect the intent of the survey, and fill it in as accurately and fairly as possible.
The survey should take you approximately five to ten minutes to complete and, hopefully, the questions are self-explanatory.  Please complete it at one sitting as it is not possible to return to alter your responses should you exit part way through. The survey will be available until 7pm on the 22nd February, after which time we will be closing it to further entries.

You are welcome to forward this email on to home educating friends who are not currently members of NCHENZ for them to contribute to the survey.  There is a link at the bottom of this email that allows you to do this.

If you have any questions regarding the survey, please feel free to contact us by email.

On behalf of the National Council of Home Educators New Zealand,

NCHENZ Executive Committee


In the early days of Home Education in New Zealand Craig organised a number of surveys through Keystone and TEACH Bulletin. It was good to get as many home educators as possible to answer the surveys. These surveys were very helpful.

I don’t think any surveys have been done for at least 15 years now except for the NCHENZ 2013 survey.

There have been a couple of indepth studies done in the last 10 years.

Beyond Homeschooling NZ 2013 by Jenny Barkley

and

PhD study on Home Education in New Zealand

It would be wonderful if as many people as possible filled out this anonymous survey being done by NCHENZ.

TEACH magazine surveys are not online at the moment

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Please share this information – thanks

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Updated 1 October 2014:  Three years on (Craig Smith’s Health) page 7 click here

*****

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading

Red Tape Cluster Buster Meetings and the Scoping Survey: http://hef.org.nz/2014/next-steps-deadline-8-december-2014/

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Stay-at-home mothers ‘have the most worthwhile lives’

Official ‘well-being’ index shows those who do not work because they are caring for children or loved-ones have strongest belief that their life is ‘worthwhile’

from this link

Mothers who have put their career aside to care for their children have a stronger sense that their lives are “worthwhile” than the rest of society, official figures suggest.

New findings from the UK’s national “well-being” index show that those classed as economically inactive because they are caring for a family or home are also among the happiest people in Britain.

They were asked to do this in relation to four separate questions: how satisfied they are with their lives overall; whether they feel that what they do is worthwhile; how happy they were the previous day and how anxious they were the previous day.

When the results are broken down by work status pensioners emerged as the happiest overall, with a rating of 7.73 out of 10, but students and stay-at-home mothers or carers also scored noticeably higher than average.

But when responses to the question on how “worthwhile” people consider what they do in life to be were analysed, those looking after home or family emerged well ahead of other groups, scoring 8.03 out of 10 on average.

Overall 83 per cent of full-time parents and carers rated their sense of worth as high or very high.

Laura Perrin, a barrister turned full-time mother who campaigns from the group Mothers At Home Matter said the figures showed that government policies designed to encourage more parents to work full time could be doing more harm than good.

“This just goes to show that the idea that we are all at home depressed and unhappy looking after our own children – which a lot of politicians would like to believe – is simply wrong,” she said.

“It is clearly a worthwhile vocation, should you choose to do it.”

They are not only making their own family happy but also making a contribution to society as a whole.

To read the full article go to: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/mother-tongue/11118738/Stay-at-home-mothers-have-the-most-worthwhile-lives.html

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From the Smiths:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/craig-smith-26-january-1951-to-30-september-2011/

Updated 22 September 2014:  Two years on (Craig Smith’s Health) page 7 click here

*****

Needing help for your home schooling journey:

http://hef.org.nz/2011/needing-help-for-your-home-schooling-journey-2/

And

Here are a couple of links to get you started home schooling:

Information on getting startedhttp://hef.org.nz/getting-started-2/

and

Information on getting an exemptionhttp://hef.org.nz/exemptions/

This link is motivational: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-what-is-it-all-about/

Exemption Form online: http://hef.org.nz/2012/home-schooling-exemption-form-now-online/

Coming Events: http://hef.org.nz/2013/some-coming-events-for-home-education-during-2013-2/

Beneficiaries: http://hef.org.nz/2013/where-to-for-beneficiary-families-now-that-the-social-security-benefit-categories-and-work-focus-amendment-bill-has-passed-its-third-reading/

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NZ Herald poll: Home school

In today’s NZ Herald poll (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/ middle of the page) is a poll on which education method is best.

The 3rd option is “Home school”. Now running at 4%. Maybe we could get it higher? :-)

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Learning to put the camera down

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It may seem counter-intuitive, especially in today’s “take and share pictures of everything” society, but research published in the journal Psychological Science points out that if you really want to commit something to memory, you’re better off looking and focusing on it – not taking a picture for later review.

Essentially, the bottom line is that we commit things to memory better when we give singular focus to the thing we want to remember.

Taking out our phone or camera and trying to take a picture fractures that focus, and makes it more difficult for our brains to cement the memory. Dr Linda Henkel of Fairfield University set up an experiment at an art museum that went something like this:

Undergraduates were led on a tour around the museum and were asked to take note of certain objects, either by photographing them or by simply observing them. The next day, their memory for the objects was tested.

The data showed that participants were less accurate in recognising the objects they had photographed compared to those they had only observed. Furthermore, they weren’t able to answer as many questions about the objects’ visual details for those objects they had photographed.

Henkel calls this the “photo-taking impairment effect”:

“When people rely on technology to remember for them – counting on the camera to record the event and thus not needing to attend to it fully themselves – it can have a negative impact on how well they remember their experiences,” she explains.

A second study replicated these findings, but it also presented an interesting twist: Taking a photograph of a specific detail on the object by zooming in on it with the camera seemed to preserve memory for the object, not just for the part that was zoomed in on but also for the part that was out of frame.

Read more here……

 

 

 

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