September 21, 2021

National Library-5 year olds

As of the beginning of Term 3, 5 year olds can borrow books from the National Library. You will need to show a copy of their birth certificates. I was told that no-one would be turned away if they happened to turn up this week.

http://www.natlib.govt.nz

This is the link for the online request form:

http://www.natlib.govt.nz/cis-online-request 

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Services for Home Educators

 

 

 

 

The Curriculum Information Service offers a wide range of curriculum related resources to support your home teaching programme. The following information outlines how to best use the CIS to ensure your needs are met.

 

Eligibility

The minimum age for home educator services is 5 years. For each child being home-educated, who is over 6 years of age, a copy of the current exemption certificate from the Ministry of Education must be presented. For children who are 5 years of age, a birth certificate must be presented. Membership ceases when a child stops being home-schooled or is over 18 years of age.

What can I get from the Curriculum Information Service?

We will provide you with children’s curriculum related resources (books, audio/visual and digital materials) but not textbooks or recreational reading. The latter material is available from your nearest public library. We do not supply material to support the New Zealand Correspondence School courses. This is the responsibility of the Correspondence School.

How do I get resources?

Visit your local National Library Centre to choose resources. Reference Librarians are available to assist. Caregivers are responsible for the care and return of resources borrowed. Please return them to the Library by the due date.

 

A postal service is available if you are unable to visit the centre. We pay for posting the material to you.  You are responsible for any return freight costs.

 

An online request form is available at:

http://www.natlib.govt.nz/cis-online-request

What can I borrow?

You may borrow up to four items per child, and include one video or DVD per family at any one time. For larger groups there is a maximum of 10 resources per group, or one per child, whichever is the higher.

If a request is made for a collaborative class of home-schooling families a maximum of 30 items may be borrowed.

For how long?

All resources are issued for five weeks but may be renewed for two more weeks if required. Renewals are available subject to demand. Renewals can be made in person, by post, phone or e-mail.

Overdue notices

Please let us know if you have an e-mail address as overdue notices are sent via e-mail. This is quick, economical and environmentally friendly.  If you don’t have an e-mail address, overdue notices are printed and posted to you.

NLNZ Catalogue

The National Library’s catalogue is available online at: http://nlnzcat.natlib.govt.nz/

Auckland Centre

National Library of New Zealand

Private Bag 99936

83 Remuera Road

Newmarket

Auckland

 

Tel:  09 523 1091 or 0800 356 000

Fax: 09 520 0152 or 0800 356 001

 

E-mail: akreq@natlib.govt.nz

Palmerston North Centre

National Library of New Zealand

Private Bag 11032

1015 Tremaine Avenue

Palmerston North

 

Tel:   06 353 0475 or 0800 171 717

Fax: 06 350 0961 or 0800 907 600

 

E-mail: cisreq@natlib.govt.nz

Christchurch Centre

National Library of New Zealand

PO Box 1380

300 Manchester Street

Christchurch

 

Tel:   03 366 1075 or 0800 928 000

Fax: 03 366 1108 or 0800 661 108

 

E-mail: chch@natlib.govt.nz

 

 

Home Educators Application

 

Form

 

 

The following questions are designed to collect information needed for our Curriculum Information Service.  To ensure our records are up-to-date a new application form will need to be completed each year.  We appreciate your assistance in answering these questions.

Supervisor’s name:

Address:

Tel/Fx

Email

Do you belong to a home school association?

If YES, what is the name of your association?

Signed

Date

OFFICIAL USE ONLY

Current certificate/s of exemption (or birth certificate for 5 year olds) sighted for (name/s of child/children):

Date Copy filed:

Please complete the following information for each child.

1. Name of Child

Date of Birth

Is your child enrolled in the NZ Correspondence School?

2. Name of Child 

Date of Birth

Is your child enrolled in the NZ Correspondence School?

3. Name of Child 

Date of Birth

Is your child enrolled in the NZ Correspondence School?

4. Name of Child 

Date of Birth

Is your child enrolled in the NZ Correspondence School? 

Please provide any additional information on a separate sheet of paper

Whakatane Friends of the Library Short Story Competition 2008

Below are details of a nationwide writing competition which may be of interest to home educators


* Whakatane Friends of the Library Short Story Competition 2008*

*Open Section Short Story. *

Entries must not exceed 1,500 words. Entry must be original and previously unpublished.

All entries must be typed in double spacing.

*The open section is proudly sponsored by:*

*Norske Skog. Opus International Consultants Ltd. Friends of the Library.*

*Open Section Winner: $500*

*And in addition there are two Merit Prizes of $100*

*To enable the winner to attend the prize giving, a night for two (should the winner live out of town):*

*At Bay Hotel Units.*

*Local Entry Prize: $150* proudly sponsored by *Radio 1XX.*

*With author’s consent the winning story will be published in the fiction section of ‘Bay Weekend.’*

Entry Fee: $7.00 for *one* story (this includes a $2 processing fee).

Two stories for $10.

Three stories $15.00

Four stories $20.00

*Under eighteen divisions.*

*Age must appear on the entry form. There is an entry fee of $5.00 for one or two stories.*

*Entry fee may be shared within school class or family – e.g. brother and sister.*

*1. For writers aged fourteen to seventeen years. *

Entries must not exceed 1,000 words. All entries must be typed in double spacing. Entry must be original and previously unpublished.

*First prize: $150* proudly sponsored by *New World** Whakatane.*

* Local Entry Prize: $100* proudly sponsored by *New World** Whakatane.*

*2. For writers aged nine to thirteen.*

Entries must not exceed 750 words. Entries may be hand written.

*First Prize: $100* book voucher proudly sponsored by *Whitcoulls.*

* Local Entry Prize: $50* book voucher proudly sponsored by* Whakatane Printers.*

*3. For writers aged eight years and under.*

*No entry fee***

Entries must not exceed 500 words. Entries may be hand written.

*First Prize: $50 book voucher* proudly sponsored by *Whitcoulls.*

* Local Entry Prize: $50 book voucher* proudly sponsored by *His Worship the Mayor*.

*Special Award*: /The Pat Gibbons Award/ for the young author who is deemed to be /going places/.

Winning story in each division published in /Christchurch// School// for Young Writers’/ “Write On” magazine.”

And the fiction section of /“Bay Weekend.”/

* *

Local entries must be within the boundaries of the Whakatane, Kawerau and Opotiki District Councils.

* *

*An entry form and fee (where applicable) must accompany all entries** -* photocopies accepted – author’s name not to appear on manuscript – word count must appear on manuscript. The official prize giving will be held in May.

For comments and results please include a SASE. The judge’s decision is final.

*Closing date: 30^th March 2008.*

*………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………*

*Entry form. _Please circle which division_ – Open – Youth **(under eighteen).*

Title of entry………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Name………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….* *

*Age if entering Youth Division*……………

Postal address………………………………………………………………………………………..

Email……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Telephone………………………………………….

Entries should be submitted unfolded in an A4 envelope, manuscripts will not be returned –

Post Entries to: *Friends of the Whakatane District Libraries. *

*P.O. Box** 361**. Whakatane 3120. New Zealand.*

*Entries are accepted from January 2008 until 30^th March 2008.*

*The */‘Open section’/* is for all age groups.*

*This is a nationwide competition, and */yes/* – we also accept entries from overseas.*

*Please make the entry fee cheque to: */Whakatane Friends of the Library./

*The winning entries are decided by a panel of judges…i.e. */Readers’ Choice/*.*

*If you include a self-addressed-envelope – you will receive a judging panel critique.*

*If you require any further information you can email:*

*Val Bird – _thebirds@xtra.co.nz_*

*Winsome Mitchell – jimwinmitchell@clear.net.nz*

Surely you home educators cannot expect the rest of us to accept that love for your child and an impressive library is a valid substitute for a teaching degree?

Surely you home educators cannot expect the rest of us to accept that love for your child and an impressive library is a valid substitute for a teaching degree?

Posted in Tough Questions

Ok, ok, I can already hear all you veteran home educators out there choking and gagging at this one. But let’s break it down and examine it.

The stated issue is that trained and certified teachers are obviously superior teachers to untrained parents. The assumptions behind this are many: that certified teachers are far more knowlegable than parents about what constitutes education; that the money and resources behind certified teachers in registered schools is clearly superior to what all but the more financially endowed parents can provide; that the entire school environment, from dedicated Ministry personnel and curriculum developers to textbook providers to overworked school administrators and board of trustee members to the enthusiastic teachers at the coalface and the brilliant variety of peers within the typical classroom, that all these things combine to provide a palpably well-rounded and comprehensive educational experience the like of which an isolated mum at home with only some out-dated School Certificate passes could never hope to match.

These assumptions, however, are all false for they are based on the false foundational idea that politically conceived, taxpayer-funded, secular and compulsorily-attended mass schooling is equivalent to even a basic education. Leaving aside completely the argument as to whether Christians should allow their children to attend secular schooling institutions, let us examine the simple logistical advantages of one mum teaching a small number of her own beloved children at home compared to the conventional classroom situation.

Most of us are aware of cases where teacher certification has not meant the same as teacher competency. In addition, there is the almost unrecognised fact that classroom logistics can make even the best teacher’s efforts an exercise in futility: over-crowded classrooms, lack of discipline, unsupportive administration, inability to give needed individual attention, time restraints which force them to move on to new material before the previous material is comprehended. Teacher certification does not ensure a quality education. In fact, many students who do not catch on at school must go home and get their parents to help out. There are already many parents out there who do the real teaching at night after school while the certified teacher gets the credit.

Home education is a tutoring or mentoring situation. One mum can give her full attention to one or two or three children at a time for whatever period of time is practical and comfortable for them all. Or she can focus on just one child for a piece of time and move to the next and then to the other. Overall she will have far, far more significant one-to-one time than what occurs in the typical classroom where the teacher can expect no more than ONE MINUTE of significant one-to-one time per pupil per day. Because of this the home school mum can cover a vastly increased measure of subject matter in the same length of time even though she may be dealing with a range of ages, possibly including a toddler and a newborn. She can assess more exactly whether each child has grasped the concepts or mastered the skills for she is observing the child for most of the waking day, is far more concerned for the child’s welfare and future prospects and is intimately in tune with the child, being her own flesh and blood, than even the most highly trained and skilled professional teacher could ever possibly be. The enthusiasm, commitment, love, vision, intimate knowledge, and one-to-one tutoring situation of the home school mum, combined with the God-given heart-desire of the child for its mother, ensures that the average home education teacher/parent is starting with vast logistical and relational advantages the classroom teacher can only dream about.

So what does a true and useful education consist of? For the school teacher it is in a politically determined mix of subjects pitched a certain way for a classroom full of children from all sorts of backgrounds and filtered through legal and other socio-political parametres with the aim of producing an outcome in students’ lives which matches a stated objective in a Ministerial document. If the powers that be decide a change is necessary, it will be a good seven years before the drafts are formulated, trialled, assessed, redrafted, approved, adopted and actually introduced and implemented. By then of course the initial problem has mutated beyond recognition and the target children have passed through the system and a new set are being served a special mix designed for a situation and a time which no longer exist.

For the home educating mum it consists of those basic skills plus general and specific knowledge she knows are required to get on in the world: she and her husband and extended family talk about what it’s like out there to be a worker, an employer, a homemaker, a spouse, a parent. They know the character qualities employers want, that they have always wanted throughout history, and that neither School Certificate exams nor university degrees impart those qualities. Christian parents in particular are individually crafting unique children to serve the God of the Universe according to the syllabus He has provided in the Scriptures. They are not that impressed with the state’s attempts through the schools to improve children, the country’s most valuable resource (right up there next to chilled lamb and green-lipped mussels), or with the socialists’ attempt to inculcate the simplistic non-judgmental vision of tolerating every perversion under the sun, somehow making our global village a better place in which to live.

The home educating mum knows that rooms, desks and books are dead things. It is imparting life from her heart to her child that makes an education. The most important lessons in her life she did not learn in the classroom but in the school of hard knocks. This is what she imparts. The children are not left interminably to interact with books or CD ROMs, but are encouraged to interact with mum and dad and other siblings and people in the real world of the home, the marketplace, the workplace and the community. They don’t only do word problems from a text book, but do real-life problems like working out the week’s menu from the available budget.

In short, marriage, parenthood and homemaking are probably the best teaching credentials one could have.

From Keystone Magazine
March 2000 , Vol. VI No. 2
P O Box 9064
Palmerston North
Phone: (06) 357-4399
Fax: (06) 357-4389
email: craig
@hef.org.nz

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